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Does A Wood Fire Produce Carbon Monoxide

PONTIAC FIRE DEPARTMENT CARBON MONOXIDE Where does carbon monoxide come from? Carbon monoxide is produced as a result of incomplete combustion. operated tools also produce CO. What to do if your carbon monoxide detector goes of f

Immediately and call your local fire department. (See "Carbon Monoxide:The Quiet Killer" at questionable and they produce ozone which can be toxic and dangerous for asthmatics. (see wood become damp,mold can grow and release

Running in an attached garage could also produce dangerous levels of carbon monoxide. However, consumers can protect themselves against CO poisoning by maintaining, • Wood stoves (13 deaths) As with fire deaths, the risk of unintentional CO death is highest for the very young (ages 4 or

Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products wood, coal, and other fuels oil, coal, and wood can produce large amounts of CO when there is insufficient oxygen available for combustion. Consumer products that burn kerosene, oil,

Carbon Monoxide • Poisonous • Odorless • Colorless kerosene, wood or charcoal is burned. Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning CO enters the lungs and blood where it competes with oxygen Exposure to carbon monoxide can produce flu-like symptoms such as: • headache • nausea

What I should know about carbon monoxide . Where does carbon monoxide come from? wood burning stoves, gas heaters, gas logs can produce unsafe levels of CO if they are unvented or not properly vented. Exhaust can seep into the home from vehicles left running in an attached garage.

The dangerous hydrogen cyanide fumes can be given off even after the fire is out wood, tobacco, cotton, paper, wool, silk, weeds, combination of hydrogen cyanide and carbon monoxide poisoning is believed to play a significant role in these deaths.

Carbon Monoxide . The Consumer Products Safety Commission reports that approximately 200 people per grills, and wood burning stoves produce it. A motor vehicle idling in a garage is a dangerous source of carbon monoxide. As you can see,

What I should know about carbon monoxide (CO) Where does carbon monoxide come from? Fireplaces, wood burning stoves, gas heaters, charcoal grills, or gas logs can produce unsafe levels of CO if they are unvented or not properly vented. a CO alarm does not sense smoke or fire.

FIRE SAFETY AND CARBON MONOXIDE . Lawson & Thompson Ltd, 20 Crawford Gardens, Unsafe gas appliances produce a highly poisonous gas called carbon monoxide (CO). wood, petrol and oil can also produce carbon monoxide.

CARBON MONOXIDE ALARMS • Wood burning fireplaces and stoves • Gas fireplaces, both vented and ventless tion) and malfunctioning heating equipment can produce dangerously high and potentially deadly concentrations of carbon monoxide.

Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths

This carbon monoxide alarm will not sense smoke, fire, or any and does not display carbon monoxide levels in PPM. Conditions That Can Produce Carbon Monoxide The following conditions can result in transient CO situations:

According to the United States Fire Administration, each year carbon monoxide poisoning That does not mean that carbon monoxide is not during cold weather, when people are using indoor heating methods. “Anything that uses a flame has the potential to produce carbon monoxide,” he

It is an invisible, odorless, colorless gas created when fuels, such as gasoline, wood, charcoal, coal, natural gas generators, cars, lawn mowers, and power washers produce carbon monoxide. Operating equipment inside an attached garage increases Office of State Fire

Kerosene, coal or wood. Carbon monoxide replaces oxygen in the blood, Generators that produce electricity Gas dryers, stoves/ovens Unvented gas fireplaces Public Act 13-272

Carbon Monoxide • Poisonous • Odorless • Colorless kerosene, wood or charcoal is burned. Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning CO enters the lungs and blood where it competes with oxygen Exposure to carbon monoxide can produce flu-like symptoms such as: • headache • nausea

Carbon Monoxide The “Silent Killer These fuels include gasoline, natural gas, heating oil, propane, wood, charcoal and similarly familiar products. The “silent killer” is odorless, , leaf, brush or forest fires which can produce sickening to deadly levels of CO,

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Updated: October 26, 2014 — 10:10 pm

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