HSE considers that, in general, call handlers' daily personal noise exposure is unlikely to exceed the 80 dB lower exposure action value defined in the Control of Noise at Work Regulations 2005, provided good practice in the management of noise risks is followed. Call handlers should be encouraged to report to management exposure to acoustic shock incidents and management should keep a record of these reported events.
Assessment of psychological processes related to tinnitus involves measurement of tinnitus severity and distress (i.e., nature and extent of tinnitus-related problems), measured subjectively by validated self-report tinnitus questionnaires.[16] These questionnaires measure the degree of psychological distress and handicap associated with tinnitus, including effects on hearing, lifestyle, health and emotional functioning.[63][64][65] A broader assessment of general functioning, such as levels of anxiety, depression, stress, life stressors and sleep difficulties, is also important in the assessment of tinnitus due to higher risk of negative well-being across these areas, which may be affected by or exacerbate the tinnitus symptoms for the individual.[66] Overall, current assessment measures are aimed to identify individual levels of distress and interference, coping responses and perceptions of tinnitus in order to inform treatment and monitor progress. However, wide variability, inconsistencies and lack of consensus regarding assessment methodology are evidenced in the literature, limiting comparison of treatment effectiveness.[67] Developed to guide diagnosis or classify severity, most tinnitus questionnaires have been shown to be treatment-sensitive outcome measures.[68]
Prolonged exposure to loud sound or noise levels can lead to tinnitus.[74] Ear plugs or other measures can help with prevention. Employers may use hearing loss prevention programs to help educate and prevent dangerous levels of exposure to noise. Groups like NIOSH and OSHA help set regulations to ensure employees, if following the protocol, should have minimal risk to permanent damage to their hearing.[75]
These symptoms often happen all at the same time and last anything from minutes to hours. It is a very distressing condition because it is so unpredictable. Furthermore, it can take a day or two for the symptoms to completely disappear and sufferers often feel drained after an attack. Additionally, although the condition usually starts in one ear, it can spread to both over time.

If your hearing loss is caused by a build-up of earwax, it will need to be removed. You may be able to have this done at your surgery by syringing. Warm water is flushed into your ear canal to remove the wax. But first the wax has to be softened by applying olive oil or almond oil drops, or drops containing sodium bicarbonate, for several days beforehand. You can buy these drops from your local pharmacy. In some cases, you may have to go to a specialist clinic to have wax removed by syringing or with microsuction.

Fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss may be from unknown cause or associated with Ménière’s disease. Symptoms of Meniere’s disease are hearing loss, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), and vertigo. Ménière’s disease may be treated medically with a low-sodium diet, diuretics, and corticosteroids. If the vertigo is not medically controlled, then various surgical procedures are used to eliminate the vertigo.
Vertigo is the subjective sensation of the surroundings moving or spinning. It is a symptom of inner ear disease (peripheral) or disorders associated with the brain (central). The cause of many cases of vertigo are unknown (idiopathic) although peripheral vertigo may be related to infection, trauma or chemical irritation of the semicircular canals. Central vertigo may be seen in conditions like multiple sclerosis or strokes.
Tinnitus is the perception of sound when no corresponding external sound is present.[1] While often described as a ringing, it may also sound like a clicking, buzzing, hiss, or roaring.[2] The sound may be soft or loud, low or high pitched, and appear to be coming from one or both ears.[2] In some people, the sound may interfere with concentration or increase feelings of anxiety or depression.[2] Tinnitus may be associated with some degree of hearing loss and with decreased understanding in noise.[2]
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