^ "Childhood hearing loss: act now, here's how!" (PDF). WHO. 2016. p. 6. Archived (PDF) from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 2 March 2016. Over 30% of childhood hearing loss is caused by diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, meningitis and ear infections. These can be prevented through immunization and good hygiene practices. Another 17% of childhood hearing loss results from complications at birth, including prematurity, low birth weight, birth asphyxia and neonatal jaundice. Improved maternal and child health practices would help to prevent these complications. The use of ototoxic medicines in expectant mothers and newborns, which is responsible for 4% of childhood hearing loss, could potentially be avoided.
^ McCombe A, Baguley D, Coles R, McKenna L, McKinney C, Windle-Taylor P (2001). "Guidelines for the grading of tinnitus severity: the results of a working group commissioned by the British Association of Otolaryngologists, Head and Neck Surgeons, 1999". Clinical Otolaryngology and Allied Sciences. 26 (5): 388–93. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2273.2001.00490.x. PMID 11678946. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-09-24.
Drugs.com provides accurate and independent information on more than 24,000 prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines and natural products. This material is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Data sources include IBM Watson Micromedex (updated 10 Aug 2020), Cerner Multum™ (updated 3 Aug 2020), Wolters Kluwer™ (updated 10 Aug 2020) and others.
The research carried out by Ramirez et al (14) shows the aural symptoms associated with TMD and their neurophysiological consequences are at least partially a consequence of TTTS. These aural symptoms and the typical pattern with TMD of chronic, severe myofascial pain; numbness, tingling and burning in and around the ear; escalation and trigger point development in the neck, shoulder and arm and central pain sensitisation are identical to those observed in my clients with severe ASD, and support the proposal that TTTS is the neurophysiological mechanism of ASD. However, ASD clients do not generally have temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction, unless it is part of a secondary escalation pattern. A hypothesis is presented that TMD can develop when TTTS is caused by an ASD, albeit with a different aetiologic pathway and without TMJ dysfunction.
The accepted definition of chronic tinnitus, as compared to normal ear noise experience, is five minutes of ear noise occurring at least twice a week.[51] However, people with chronic tinnitus often experience the noise more frequently than this and can experience it continuously or regularly, such as during the night when there is less environmental noise to mask the sound.
Dizziness usually refers to feeling lightheaded where the patient feels unsteady similar to the sensation felt before fainting. The causes of dizziness may be due to a wide range of conditions, many of which do not involve the ear, example : low blood sugar, sudden drop in blood pressure, alcohol and certain drugs. However, many of the causes of peripheral vertigo may result in a lightheaded feeling without the typical vertigo sensation, especially in milder cases.

Disorders responsible for hearing loss include auditory neuropathy,[57][58] Down syndrome,[59] Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease variant 1E,[60] autoimmune disease, multiple sclerosis, meningitis, cholesteatoma, otosclerosis, perilymph fistula, Ménière's disease, recurring ear infections, strokes, superior semicircular canal dehiscence, Pierre Robin, Treacher-Collins, Retinitis Pigmentosa, Pedreds, and Turners syndrome, syphilis, vestibular schwannoma, and viral infections such as measles, mumps, congenital rubella (also called German measles) syndrome, several varieties of herpes viruses,[61] HIV/AIDS,[62] and West Nile virus.

Ramirez et al (14) aimed to explore the anatomical and physiological connections in TMD patients with secondary aural symptoms and the central and peripheral mechanisms involved. The authors carried out an extensive peer-reviewed literature search, using data from (12), 436 patients in 49 papers, to analyse aural symptoms (otalgia, tinnitus, vertigo, subjective hearing loss and aural fullness) exacerbated by dysfunctional mouth and jaw dynamics. They proposed a range of muscular, bone communication and neural scenarios to explain this relationship, placing emphasis on tensor tympani muscle involvement and trigeminal nerve dysfunction.

Subjective tinnitus is the most frequent type of tinnitus. It may have many possible causes, but most commonly it results from hearing loss. When the tinnitus is caused by disorders of the inner ear or auditory nerve it is called otic (from the Greek word for ear).[23] These otological or neurological conditions include those triggered by infections, drugs, or trauma.[24] A frequent cause is traumatic noise exposure that damages hair cells in the inner ear.
There is a strong relationship between hearing loss and tinnitus. Any ear problem but particularly hearing loss can 'unmask' the perception of tinnitus, but some patients with tinnitus have no hearing loss. Correction of hearing loss with hearing aids is known to have a beneficial effect upon tinnitus, but sometimes simple reassurance alone is sufficient.
Deafness is defined as a degree of loss such that a person is unable to understand speech, even in the presence of amplification.[15] In profound deafness, even the highest intensity sounds produced by an audiometer (an instrument used to measure hearing by producing pure tone sounds through a range of frequencies) may not be detected. In total deafness, no sounds at all, regardless of amplification or method of production, can be heard.
Hyperacusis escalation is common with ASD so that an increasing range of sounds become intolerable, with a corresponding escalation in TTTS symptoms, potentially leading to TMD. For this reason, a detailed history is essential in tracking the order of development and escalation of symptoms, and their relationship to acoustic incidents/headset use, prior to making a responsible and considered diagnosis of ASD.
Disorders responsible for hearing loss include auditory neuropathy,[57][58] Down syndrome,[59] Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease variant 1E,[60] autoimmune disease, multiple sclerosis, meningitis, cholesteatoma, otosclerosis, perilymph fistula, Ménière's disease, recurring ear infections, strokes, superior semicircular canal dehiscence, Pierre Robin, Treacher-Collins, Retinitis Pigmentosa, Pedreds, and Turners syndrome, syphilis, vestibular schwannoma, and viral infections such as measles, mumps, congenital rubella (also called German measles) syndrome, several varieties of herpes viruses,[61] HIV/AIDS,[62] and West Nile virus.
Since most persons with tinnitus also have hearing loss, a pure tone hearing test resulting in an audiogram may help diagnose a cause, though some persons with tinnitus do not have hearing loss. An audiogram may also facilitate fitting of a hearing aid in those cases where hearing loss is significant. The pitch of tinnitus is often in the range of the hearing loss.
If you develop hearing loss due to a buildup of wax in the ear canal, you can remove the wax at home. Over-the-counter solutions, including wax softeners, can remove wax from the ear. Syringes can also push warm water through the ear canal to remove the wax. Consult your doctor before attempting to remove any object stuck in your ear to avoid unintentionally damaging your ear.
Some instances of tinnitus are caused by infections or blockages in the ear, and the tinnitus can disappear once the underlying cause is treated. Frequently, however, tinnitus continues after the underlying condition is treated. In such a case, other therapies -- both conventional and alternative -- may bring significant relief by either decreasing or covering up the unwanted sound.
×