Tinnitus (pronounced tih-NITE-us or TIN-ih-tus) is sound in the head with no external source. For many, it's a ringing sound, while for others, it's whistling, buzzing, chirping, hissing, humming, roaring, or even shrieking. The sound may seem to come from one ear or both, from inside the head, or from a distance. It may be constant or intermittent, steady or pulsating.

Tinnitus remains a symptom that affects the lives of millions of people. Research is directed not only at its treatment, but also at understanding why it occurs. Research by doctors at the University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Dalhousie University (Canada), and Southeast China University have published research using electrophysiology and functional MRI to better understand what parts of the brain are involved in hearing and the production of tinnitus. Their research has found that much larger areas of the brain are involved with the process of hearing than previously believed, which may help direct future diagnostic and therapeutic options.
It is estimated that half of cases of hearing loss are preventable.[85] About 60% of hearing loss in children under the age of 15 can be avoided.[2] A number of preventive strategies are effective including: immunization against rubella to prevent congenital rubella syndrome, immunization against H. influenza and S. pneumoniae to reduce cases of meningitis, and avoiding or protecting against excessive noise exposure.[15] The World Health Organization also recommends immunization against measles, mumps, and meningitis, efforts to prevent premature birth, and avoidance of certain medication as prevention.[86] World Hearing Day is a yearly event to promote actions to prevent hearing damage.

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This article was medically reviewed by Luba Lee, FNP-BC, MS. Luba Lee, FNP-BC is a board certified Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) and educator in Tennessee with over a decade of clinical experience. Luba has certifications in Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS), Emergency Medicine, Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), Team Building, and Critical Care Nursing. She received her Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) from the University of Tennessee in 2006. This article has been viewed 3,276,631 times.
Acoustic qualification of tinnitus will include measurement of several acoustic parameters like frequency in cases of monotone tinnitus or frequency range and bandwidth in cases of narrow band noise tinnitus, loudness in dB above hearing threshold at the indicated frequency, mixing-point, and minimum masking level.[52] In most cases, tinnitus pitch or frequency range is between 5 kHz and 10 kHz,[53] and loudness between 5 and 15 dB above the hearing threshold.[54]
A brain tumor can be either non-cancerous (benign) or cancerous (malignant), primary, or secondary. Common symptoms of a primary brain tumor are headaches, seizures, memory problems, personality changes, and nausea and vomiting. Causes and risk factors include age, gender, family history, and exposure to chemicals. Treatment is depends upon the tumor type, grade, and location.
For clients with severe ASD, listening to sounds via headphones during a hearing assessment can be highly threatening and often leads to a significant increase in symptoms, which can persist for days. I consider that frequent audiological testing should not be carried out for these clients. Suprathreshold audiological testing should be limited and loudness discomfort testing, in particular acoustic reflex testing due to the volume levels required, is contraindicated. Some ASD clients have unfortunately had their symptoms permanently exacerbated as a result of a traumatic response to acoustic reflex testing.
'Acoustic shock' is a term used in connection with incidents involving exposure to short duration, high frequency, high intensity sounds through a telephone headset. Some sources suggest that these incidents are associated with a range of physiological and psychological symptoms that have been reported amongst headset wearers. It has not been established whether the reported symptoms are caused directly by exposure to these unexpected sounds. There is no clear single cause of these incidents, but one cause may be interference on the telephone line. Although call handlers may be shocked or startled by the sounds, exposure to them should not cause hearing damage as assessed by conventional methods.
Pain was the most frequent symptom, reported by 95%. Of these, 81% reported ear pain, 11% pain in the neck or jaw, and 7% facial pain. Tinnitus was reported by 50%, usually accompanied by other symptoms, but in 6% it was the only symptom. Loss of balance was reported by 48%. The most distressing and durable symptom tended to be hyperacusis, reported by 32%.
Acoustic qualification of tinnitus will include measurement of several acoustic parameters like frequency in cases of monotone tinnitus or frequency range and bandwidth in cases of narrow band noise tinnitus, loudness in dB above hearing threshold at the indicated frequency, mixing-point, and minimum masking level.[52] In most cases, tinnitus pitch or frequency range is between 5 kHz and 10 kHz,[53] and loudness between 5 and 15 dB above the hearing threshold.[54]
Deaf culture refers to a tight-knit cultural group of people whose primary language is signed, and who practice social and cultural norms which are distinct from those of the surrounding hearing community. This community does not automatically include all those who are clinically or legally deaf, nor does it exclude every hearing person. According to Baker and Padden, it includes any person or persons who "identifies him/herself as a member of the Deaf community, and other members accept that person as a part of the community,"[114] an example being children of deaf adults with normal hearing ability. It includes the set of social beliefs, behaviors, art, literary traditions, history, values, and shared institutions of communities that are influenced by deafness and which use sign languages as the main means of communication.[115][116] Members of the Deaf community tend to view deafness as a difference in human experience rather than a disability or disease.[117][118] When used as a cultural label especially within the culture, the word deaf is often written with a capital D and referred to as "big D Deaf" in speech and sign. When used as a label for the audiological condition, it is written with a lower case d.[115][116]
The accepted definition of chronic tinnitus, as compared to normal ear noise experience, is five minutes of ear noise occurring at least twice a week.[51] However, people with chronic tinnitus often experience the noise more frequently than this and can experience it continuously or regularly, such as during the night when there is less environmental noise to mask the sound.
^ Langguth B, Goodey R, Azevedo A, et al. (2007). "Consensus for tinnitus patient assessment and treatment outcome measurement: Tinnitus Research Initiative meeting, Regensburg, July 2006". Tinnitus: Pathophysiology and Treatment. Progress in Brain Research. 166. pp. 525–36. doi:10.1016/S0079-6123(07)66050-6. ISBN 978-0444531674. PMC 4283806. PMID 17956816.
Outer ear infection: otitis externa – usually affects adults aged 45 to 75. It affects the ear canal and is often caused by bacterial infection of the skin of the canal, or a fungus or a yeast. It can also be caused by an irritation such as wearing earplugs or a hearing aid. It is common in people who suffer from skin problems such as eczema, psoriasis or dermatitis but also in people who are keen swimmers.
People often say that they are aware of noises in the ears when they have a cold, an ear infection or wax blocking the ear. Sometimes people become aware of tinnitus following a really stressful event and once they’re aware of it, seem to notice it more and more, but this usually fades once these things have passed. However, some people continue to notice the tinnitus, for example after an infection has cleared up.
I have had cricket sounds (pulsing noise) in my tinnitus condition for the last 2 months. Supplements help, if the condition includes dizziness. I recommend LipoFlavinoids (or Citrus Flavinoids from other brands like Now), Gingko Bilboa, Tumeric Circumin. As I also have have mild tension headaches I use also B12 - 1000 mcg, B100 complex, Cherry (Bing) extract, B2 - 100mg. If you do not have headaches, I recommend the B100 complex.
▶ For most inner ear problems, a sodium-restricted, caffeine-free diet is recommended. Caffeine is a central nervous system stimulant and its intake makes the symptoms of inner ear disorder (especially headache and dizziness) appear more pronounced. Hence, it is advisable to reduce the intake of caffeine as much as possible till the condition is completely treated. Excess sugar in the diet also triggers dizziness.
About half of hearing loss globally is preventable through public health measures.[2] Such practices include immunization, proper care around pregnancy, avoiding loud noise, and avoiding certain medications.[2] The World Health Organization recommends that young people limit exposure to loud sounds and the use of personal audio players to an hour a day in an effort to limit exposure to noise.[11] Early identification and support are particularly important in children.[2] For many, hearing aids, sign language, cochlear implants and subtitles are useful.[2] Lip reading is another useful skill some develop.[2] Access to hearing aids, however, is limited in many areas of the world.[2]
^ "Childhood hearing loss: act now, here's how!" (PDF). WHO. 2016. p. 6. Archived (PDF) from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 2 March 2016. Over 30% of childhood hearing loss is caused by diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, meningitis and ear infections. These can be prevented through immunization and good hygiene practices. Another 17% of childhood hearing loss results from complications at birth, including prematurity, low birth weight, birth asphyxia and neonatal jaundice. Improved maternal and child health practices would help to prevent these complications. The use of ototoxic medicines in expectant mothers and newborns, which is responsible for 4% of childhood hearing loss, could potentially be avoided.
Look into biofeedback therapy for your tinnitus. If you are depressed, stressed, or fatigued, then you may be more susceptible to normal head sounds. Look into biofeedback therapy from a counselor who can help you to tune into the feelings and situations that cause or worsen your tinnitus. This may help you to stop tinnitus when it starts and prevent it from coming back.[2]
^ El Dib RP, Mathew JL, Martins RH (April 2012). El Dib RP (ed.). "Interventions to promote the wearing of hearing protection". The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 4 (4): CD005234. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD005234.pub5. PMID 22513929. (Retracted, see doi:10.1002/14651858.cd005234.pub6. If this is an intentional citation to a retracted paper, please replace {{Retracted}} with {{Retracted|intentional=yes}}.)
Look into biofeedback therapy for your tinnitus. If you are depressed, stressed, or fatigued, then you may be more susceptible to normal head sounds. Look into biofeedback therapy from a counselor who can help you to tune into the feelings and situations that cause or worsen your tinnitus. This may help you to stop tinnitus when it starts and prevent it from coming back.[2]
Tinnitus is commonly thought of as a symptom of adulthood, and is often overlooked in children. Children with hearing loss have a high incidence of tinnitus, even though they do not express the condition or its effect on their lives.[112][113] Children do not generally report tinnitus spontaneously and their complaints may not be taken seriously.[114] Among those children who do complain of tinnitus, there is an increased likelihood of associated otological or neurological pathology such as migraine, juvenile Meniere's disease or chronic suppurative otitis media.[115] Its reported prevalence varies from 12% to 36% in children with normal hearing thresholds and up to 66% in children with a hearing loss and approximately 3–10% of children have been reported to be troubled by tinnitus.[116]
The potential severity and persistence of ASD symptoms have significant clinical and medico-legal implications. With the rapid growth of call centres around the world, professionals providing tinnitus and hyperacusis therapy, as well as general practitioners, ENT specialists, occupational physicians, TMD specialists, neurologists and trauma psychologists/psychiatrists, are increasingly likely to encounter some or all of the cluster of ASD symptoms in their clients.

Tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, is the perception of sound when there is no external sound present. It is not a condition by itself but instead a symptom of an underlying cause. Many patients describe the sound as a high-pitched ringing, but it may also be a clicking, buzzing, whooshing, roaring, or hissing. The sound can vary in volume and can be either unilateral or bilateral. In most patients, tinnitus occurs gradually. It can significantly impact the quality of life, causing depression, anxiety, and loss of concentration.
Exposure to loud noise. Loud noises, such as those from heavy equipment, chain saws and firearms, are common sources of noise-related hearing loss. Portable music devices, such as MP3 players or iPods, also can cause noise-related hearing loss if played loudly for long periods. Tinnitus caused by short-term exposure, such as attending a loud concert, usually goes away; both short- and long-term exposure to loud sound can cause permanent damage.
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