No. The worst case scenario is that the ringing in your ears may suggest you have permanent tinnitus and this may have a negative impact on your day to day life affecting your concentration, sleep and work performance which may lead to insomnia or depression for example. However, this can be controlled through certain therapies such as sound therapy and other self-help methods, which helps a person cope with tinnitus if it happens to be permanent.
Very regularly we see people who, after exposure to sudden and loud noise, are bothered by tinnitus, hyperacusis, hearing loss, pressure in the ear, aversion and fear of sounds, depression, etc.. However, a hearing test does not show signs of hearing damage or a noise trauma. This is characteristic of an "Acoustic Shock". Usually the symptoms disappear quite quickly, but when the symptoms persist, they speak of an Acoustic Shock Disorder (ASD).
The inner ear contains a group of interconnected, fluid-filled chambers. The snail-shaped chamber, called the cochlea (KOK-lee-uh), plays a role in hearing. Sound vibrations from the bones of the middle ear are transferred to the fluids of the cochlea. Tiny sensors (hair cells) lining the cochlea convert the vibrations into electrical impulses that are transmitted along the auditory nerve to your brain.
Audiologists recommend taking care of the conductive component first. There have been times when the addition of the conductive component made the person a better hearing aid candidate, by flattening out the audiogram for example, while the underlying sensorineural component presented a high-frequency loss. However, the emphasis would still be on treating medically what can be treated. Generally, you would expect positive results.
With the identification of ASD, output limiters in headset equipment have been developed to restrict maximum volume levels transmitted down a telephone line. However, ASD continues to occur despite their use. In my opinion, they are of benefit primarily to help reduce the probability of an initial acoustic incident exposure. The dominant factors of an acoustic incident leading to ASD appear related to the sudden onset, unexpectedness and impact quality of loudish sounds outside the person's control near to the ear(s), rather than to high volume levels alone. If TTTS develops, because of the vulnerability of further escalation to acoustic incidents at lower volume levels, it is impossible to give a 100% guarantee of protection.

Conductive hearing loss occurs when sounds aren’t able to travel from the outer ear to the eardrum and the bones of the middle ear. When this type of hearing loss occurs, you may find it difficult to hear soft or muffled sounds. Conductive hearing loss isn’t always permanent. Medical interventions can treat it. Treatment may include antibiotics or surgical interventions, such as a cochlear implant. A cochlear implant is a small electrical machine placed under your skin behind the ear. It translates sound vibrations into electrical signals that your brain can then interpret as meaningful sound.
Tinnitus is commonly thought of as a symptom of adulthood, and is often overlooked in children. Children with hearing loss have a high incidence of tinnitus, even though they do not express the condition or its effect on their lives.[112][113] Children do not generally report tinnitus spontaneously and their complaints may not be taken seriously.[114] Among those children who do complain of tinnitus, there is an increased likelihood of associated otological or neurological pathology such as migraine, juvenile Meniere's disease or chronic suppurative otitis media.[115] Its reported prevalence varies from 12% to 36% in children with normal hearing thresholds and up to 66% in children with a hearing loss and approximately 3–10% of children have been reported to be troubled by tinnitus.[116]
4. Noise at Work regulations demand that headset wearers are not exposed to more than a certain amount of noise in any given shift. The aforementioned devices try to make their brand of headset conform to this by different means. One manufacturer takes the prescribed level, say 84dB, and raises volume that is below that level or lowers volume that is above it to ensure that everything is at, say 84dB. Another manufacturer’s offering tries to predict the total noise exposure over a shift by extrapolising current levels and progressively clamping down on or increasing the volume available to the headset wearer. This is comparable to those trip computers in some cars which predict your fuel range based on present consumption and use comparitive, rather than absolute, measurement criteria.
Globally, hearing loss affects about 10% of the population to some degree.[50] It caused moderate to severe disability in 124.2 million people as of 2004 (107.9 million of whom are in low and middle income countries).[13] Of these 65 million acquired the condition during childhood.[15] At birth ~3 per 1000 in developed countries and more than 6 per 1000 in developing countries have hearing problems.[15]
Rapid referral for a comprehensive audiological assessment provides reassurance, and can help control an escalation of symptoms and limit the development of hyperacusis. History taking should document immediate and persistent symptoms since the acoustic incident exposure; prior acoustic incident exposures; and prior otological and psychological history. Significant malingering is rare in ASD clients, in my experience. Most clients are bewildered, frightened or angered by their symptoms and desperate to recover.
Prolonged exposure to loud sound or noise levels can lead to tinnitus.[74] Ear plugs or other measures can help with prevention. Employers may use hearing loss prevention programs to help educate and prevent dangerous levels of exposure to noise. Groups like NIOSH and OSHA help set regulations to ensure employees, if following the protocol, should have minimal risk to permanent damage to their hearing.[75]
EYES AND VISIONEARS, NOSE AND THROATSKIN, HAIR, NAILSHEART AND VESSELSKIDNEYS AND URINARY TRACTBLOOD AND IMMUNITYLIVER AND GALLBLADDERLUNGS AND AIRWAYSUPPER AND LOWER LIMBWOMEN’S HEALTH AND PREGNANCYWOMEN’S HEALTHKIDS HEALTHMEN’S HEALTHABCD – FIRST AID: INJURIES, POISONINGNEWBORNS BABIESHORMONES AND METABOLISMMEDICATION, SUPPLEMENTSMEDICAL TERMINOLOGYNUTRITIONSURGERY AND OTHER PROCEDURES
ASD causes a specific and consistent pattern of neurophysiological and psychological symptoms. Initial symptoms include a severe startle reaction, often with a head and neck jerk, and a shock/trauma reaction with symptoms of disorientation, distress, shakiness, crying, headache, fatigue. A severe ASD can lead to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Other symptoms can include pain/blockage/pressure/tympanic fluttering in the ear; pain/burning/numbness around the ear/jaw/neck; tinnitus, hyperacusis and phonophobia; mild vertigo and nausea; headache; and subjective muffled/distorted hearing. ASD generally does not result in a hearing loss, although if present it tends not to follow the typical high frequency pattern of a noise induced hearing injury but affects low and mid frequency sensorineural hearing (1, 2).
Most tinnitus is subjective, meaning that only you can hear the noise. But sometimes it's objective, meaning that someone else can hear it, too. For example, if you have a heart murmur, you may hear a whooshing sound with every heartbeat; your clinician can also hear that sound through a stethoscope. Some people hear their heartbeat inside the ear — a phenomenon called pulsatile tinnitus. It's more likely to happen in older people, because blood flow tends to be more turbulent in arteries whose walls have stiffened with age. Pulsatile tinnitus may be more noticeable at night, when you're lying in bed and there are fewer external sounds to mask the tinnitus. If you notice any new pulsatile tinnitus, you should consult a clinician, because in rare cases it is a sign of a tumor or blood vessel damage.
Tinnitus may be perceived in one or both ears. The noise can be described in many different ways but is reported as a noise inside a person's head in the absence of auditory stimulation. It often is described as a ringing noise, but in some people, it takes the form of a high-pitched whining, electric buzzing, hissing, humming, tinging, whistling, ticking, clicking, roaring, beeping, sizzling, a pure steady tone such as that heard during a hearing test, or sounds that slightly resemble human voices, tunes, songs, or animal sounds such as "crickets", "tree frogs", or "locusts (cicadas)".[4] Tinnitus may be intermittent or continuous: in the latter case, it may be the cause of great distress. In some individuals, the intensity may be changed by shoulder, head, tongue, jaw, or eye movements.[7]
Response Tap cookies provide us with insight as to how our pages are used before calls are made. This tells us which page on the BMI Healthcare website a user was viewing at the time that they made a call to our contact centre. The data that this provides is aggregated and anonymised, meaning that all visitors to our website are not identifiable. BMI then uses this information to better understand how to update and improve the performance of our website.
It is not a disease or illness; it is a symptom generated within the auditory system and usually caused by an underlying condition. The noise may be in one or both ears, or it may feel like it is in the head. It is difficult to pinpoint its exact location. It may be low, medium or high pitched and can be heard as a single noise or as multiple components.

If you are experiencing hearing loss, you should see an ENT (ear, nose, and throat) specialist, or otolaryngologist, who can make a specific diagnosis for you, and talk to you about treatment options, including surgical procedures. A critical part of the evaluation will be a hearing test (audiogram) performed by an audiologist (a professional who tests hearing function) to determine the severity of your loss as well as determine if the hearing loss is conductive, sensorineural, or a mix of both.
Boosting your immune system may also stop ringing in your ears. This will help to protect you from infections and diseases that may increase the level of unwanted sound. Also, an improvement in your health can mean an improvement in your tinnitus. Have a healthy lifestyle, which especially includes a healthy diet, proper and regular exercise, and enough sleep at night.

This is a very structured approach to managing tinnitus. Basically, TRT assumes that the tinnitus has been prioritised as an important signal. TRT uses sounds at a particular level to try to reduce the priority of the tinnitus so that you no longer hear it. It is based on the idea that we can get used to sounds, e.g. the sound of the fridge or air conditioner, so we can also get used to this sound of tinnitus. The process of getting used to the tinnitus sound is called habituation. TRT uses sound generators and counselling to attempt to retrain how the brain processes sound so that you habituate to the tinnitus. Most people working in the tinnitus field will use elements of TRT but the strict method is not frequently used because there is limited evidence for its effectiveness.

Ginkgo biloba does not appear to be effective.[94][108] The American Academy of Otolaryngology recommends against taking melatonin or zinc supplements to relieve symptoms of tinnitus, and reported that evidence for efficacy of many dietary supplements—lipoflavonoids, garlic, homeopathy, traditional Chinese/Korean herbal medicine, honeybee larvae, other various vitamins and minerals—did not exist.[74] A 2016 Cochrane Review also concluded that evidence was not sufficient to support taking zinc supplements to reduce symptoms associated with tinnitus.[109]

Tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, is the perception of sound when there is no external sound present. It is not a condition by itself but instead a symptom of an underlying cause. Many patients describe the sound as a high-pitched ringing, but it may also be a clicking, buzzing, whooshing, roaring, or hissing. The sound can vary in volume and can be either unilateral or bilateral. In most patients, tinnitus occurs gradually. It can significantly impact the quality of life, causing depression, anxiety, and loss of concentration.
Other potential sources of the sounds normally associated with tinnitus should be ruled out. For instance, two recognized sources of high-pitched sounds might be electromagnetic fields common in modern wiring and various sound signal transmissions. A common and often misdiagnosed condition that mimics tinnitus is radio frequency (RF) hearing, in which subjects have been tested and found to hear high-pitched transmission frequencies that sound similar to tinnitus.[72][73]
The mechanism behind ASD is probably a combination of sustained load on the ear and excessive stress. The stress network in the brain (e.g. amygdala, parahippocampus, anterior cingulate cortex, insula, frontal cortex, etc.) can go into 'overdrive' through prolonged stress, causing muscles of the neck, jaws and shoulders to stretch. When exposed to a sound, especially if it occurs suddenly and unexpectedly, the muscles that are used during the pricking of the ears would cramp (Tensor Tympani syndrome).

Ringing/buzzing/humming/ringing are all called tinnitus. The best things you can do are A) avoid loud noise exposure, as noise exposure can make it worse, B) limit your salt and caffeine intake, as both of these have been linked with tinnitus, C) avoid silent environments (i.e. sleep with a fan/radio/podcast on, do homework while listening to music, etc). While there is no cure for tinnitus and no way to make it vanish completely, avoiding loud noise exposure and using gentle background noise are the recommended "treatments."

There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that some tinnitus is a consequence of neuroplastic alterations in the central auditory pathway. These alterations are assumed to result from a disturbed sensory input, caused by hearing loss.[26] Hearing loss could indeed cause a homeostatic response of neurons in the central auditory system, and therefore cause tinnitus.[27]
×