Hello when I stand after sitting and driving I fell like unstedy I can’t hear properly like sounds getting high and low each seconds …after 2 or 3 minutes only I came back normal hearing sounds…I have this problem from last 2 years …on starting stage I got ear infection and undergo nose operation they removed my inside nose tissues still i have this problem what can i do..
I have just recently started working as a medical interpreter remotely. I started mid August 2015 to be more exact. The pain in my ears is slowly increasing and last night I noticed a a painful bump behind my right ear which is the appear I usually put the headset over my right ear which is my good ear. I’m highly considering going back to in-person interpreting after learning about “acoustic shock”. The last thing I want is to loose the hearing in my right ear!
When you first experience tinnitus, you may naturally be worried and very aware of this new sound. We constantly monitor our bodies and if anything changes, we become aware of the changes. Hearing tinnitus for the first time can be quite frightening if you think it means that something is wrong with you, or that it might change your life. It’s a new sensation and you need to give yourself time to adapt.

If you develop tinnitus, it's important to see your clinician. She or he will take a medical history, give you a physical examination, and do a series of tests to try to find the source of the problem. She or he will also ask you to describe the noise you're hearing (including its pitch and sound quality, and whether it's constant or periodic, steady or pulsatile) and the times and places in which you hear it. Your clinician will review your medical history, your current and past exposure to noise, and any medications or supplements you're taking. Tinnitus can be a side effect of many medications, especially when taken at higher doses (see "Some drugs that can cause or worsen tinnitus").
i am currently studying acoustic shock for a course i am taking. i do also work in a headset environment in a large office. I would be interested to hear of anyones experiences of acoustic shock, temporary real or perceived. i myself suffer from the confused hearing loss, unable to clearly know which direction noises are coming from. especially dangerous when you have police, ambulance or fire engine sirens coming close to you. not knowing the direction they are coming from makes it difficult to remove yourself from their way eg at a roundabout… my sleep is also disturbed on occassion, by low drumming noises. this has only happened over the past 5yrs whilst working a lot on the telephone section of my department. a lot of customers answer the phone whilst holding a screaming baby or have a parrot screeching behind them, some shout down the phone suddenly, the noise seems intensified when it is held in a headpiece….
Pure tone audiometry, a standardized hearing test over a set of frequencies from 250 Hz to 8000 Hz, may be conducted by a medical doctor, audiologist or audiometrist, with the result plotted separately for each ear on an audiogram. The shape of the plot reveals the degree and nature of hearing loss, distinguishing conductive hearing loss from other kinds of hearing loss. A conductive hearing loss is characterized by a difference of at least 15 decibels between the air conduction threshold and bone conduction threshold at the same frequency. On an audiogram, the "x" represents responses in the left ear at each frequency, while the "o" represents responses in right ear at each frequency.
Call centre staff are therefore particularly vulnerable: the workplaces are often large, open plan environments with high levels of ambient noise, requiring the operator to turn up the volume of their headset, increasing vulnerability to acoustic incident exposure. Additionally, the workplace environment is potentially stressful: the job requirements are often competitive, monitored and repetitive, with the calls made frequently unwelcome
Other infections. Sometimes, the bacteria can spread deeper into your skin or to other parts of your body. One rare condition is malignant otitis externa, which happens when the infection moves into bone and cartilage in your head. It's a medical emergency, and it's most common in older people with diabetes and people with HIV or other immune system problems.
Masking. Masking devices, worn like hearing aids, generate low-level white noise (a high-pitched hiss, for example) that can reduce the perception of tinnitus and sometimes also produce residual inhibition — less noticeable tinnitus for a short time after the masker is turned off. A specialized device isn't always necessary for masking; often, playing music or having a radio, fan, or white-noise machine on in the background is enough. Although there's not enough evidence from randomized trials to draw any conclusions about the effectiveness of masking, hearing experts often recommend a trial of simple masking strategies (such as setting a radio at low volume between stations) before they turn to more expensive options.

Assessment of psychological processes related to tinnitus involves measurement of tinnitus severity and distress (i.e., nature and extent of tinnitus-related problems), measured subjectively by validated self-report tinnitus questionnaires.[16] These questionnaires measure the degree of psychological distress and handicap associated with tinnitus, including effects on hearing, lifestyle, health and emotional functioning.[63][64][65] A broader assessment of general functioning, such as levels of anxiety, depression, stress, life stressors and sleep difficulties, is also important in the assessment of tinnitus due to higher risk of negative well-being across these areas, which may be affected by or exacerbate the tinnitus symptoms for the individual.[66] Overall, current assessment measures are aimed to identify individual levels of distress and interference, coping responses and perceptions of tinnitus in order to inform treatment and monitor progress. However, wide variability, inconsistencies and lack of consensus regarding assessment methodology are evidenced in the literature, limiting comparison of treatment effectiveness.[67] Developed to guide diagnosis or classify severity, most tinnitus questionnaires have been shown to be treatment-sensitive outcome measures.[68]
A common cause of tinnitus is inner ear hair cell damage. Tiny, delicate hairs in your inner ear move in relation to the pressure of sound waves. This triggers cells to release an electrical signal through a nerve from your ear (auditory nerve) to your brain. Your brain interprets these signals as sound. If the hairs inside your inner ear are bent or broken, they can "leak" random electrical impulses to your brain, causing tinnitus.
Atherosclerosis. With age and buildup of cholesterol and other deposits, major blood vessels close to your middle and inner ear lose some of their elasticity — the ability to flex or expand slightly with each heartbeat. That causes blood flow to become more forceful, making it easier for your ear to detect the beats. You can generally hear this type of tinnitus in both ears.
×