Sensorineural causes of hearing loss involve the inner ear or brain and are usually, but not always, permanent. Implants and more invasive procedures may help to restore hearing. Birth defects (prenatal infection, injury during childbirth, and genetic disorders), infections particularly in childhood and age-related degeneration (presbycusis / presbyacusis) are more frequent causes of this type of hearing loss. Sudden, unilateral hearing loss may be related to conditions like a stroke.
Hyperacusis escalation is common with ASD so that an increasing range of sounds become intolerable, with a corresponding escalation in TTTS symptoms, potentially leading to TMD. For this reason, a detailed history is essential in tracking the order of development and escalation of symptoms, and their relationship to acoustic incidents/headset use, prior to making a responsible and considered diagnosis of ASD.
3. A number of headset manufacturers produce “acoustic shock prevention” devices for their headsets to plug into. They are relatively primitive devices that simply attenuate (raise or lower volume of) incoming sound. This means that if a loud noise comes in the unit will suppress all sound that the headset wearer hears including the caller’s voice.

Conductive hearing loss is sometimes temporary and can be treated with medication or minor surgery, if necessary. However, more major surgery may be required to fix the ear drum or hearing bones. If conventional hearing aids don't work, there are also some implantable devices for this type of hearing loss, such as a Bone Anchored Hearing Aids (BAHAs).
I have had cricket sounds (pulsing noise) in my tinnitus condition for the last 2 months. Supplements help, if the condition includes dizziness. I recommend LipoFlavinoids (or Citrus Flavinoids from other brands like Now), Gingko Bilboa, Tumeric Circumin. As I also have have mild tension headaches I use also B12 - 1000 mcg, B100 complex, Cherry (Bing) extract, B2 - 100mg. If you do not have headaches, I recommend the B100 complex.

Your symptoms will depend on the cause of your hearing loss and your age. For adults, symptoms may include having trouble hearing. A common first sign is difficulty in understanding people, particularly in noisy places. You may complain that others are mumbling. Your ear may feel muffled, blocked or plugged. You may also feel as though there is water or pressure in your ear.
Labyrinthitis is inflammation of the labyrinth (the part of the ear responsible for balance and hearing). Doctors do not know the exact cause of labyrinthitis; however, they often are associated viral infections of the inner ear. Symptoms of labyrinthitis are ear pain or earache, ear discharge, problems with balance and walking, ringing in the ears, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, and vertigo. Viral infections associated with labyrinthitis are contagious.
This article was medically reviewed by Luba Lee, FNP-BC, MS. Luba Lee, FNP-BC is a board certified Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) and educator in Tennessee with over a decade of clinical experience. Luba has certifications in Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS), Emergency Medicine, Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), Team Building, and Critical Care Nursing. She received her Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) from the University of Tennessee in 2006. This article has been viewed 3,276,631 times.
Your ear consists of three major areas: outer ear, middle ear and inner ear. Sound waves pass through the outer ear and cause vibrations at the eardrum. The eardrum and three small bones of the middle ear amplify the vibrations as they travel to the inner ear. There, the vibrations pass through fluid in a snail-shaped structure in the inner ear (cochlea).
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If your hearing loss is caused by a build-up of earwax, it will need to be removed. You may be able to have this done at your surgery by syringing. Warm water is flushed into your ear canal to remove the wax. But first the wax has to be softened by applying olive oil or almond oil drops, or drops containing sodium bicarbonate, for several days beforehand. You can buy these drops from your local pharmacy. In some cases, you may have to go to a specialist clinic to have wax removed by syringing or with microsuction.
Fluctuating sensorineural hearing loss may be from unknown cause or associated with Ménière’s disease. Symptoms of Meniere’s disease are hearing loss, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), and vertigo. Ménière’s disease may be treated medically with a low-sodium diet, diuretics, and corticosteroids. If the vertigo is not medically controlled, then various surgical procedures are used to eliminate the vertigo.
Pain was the most frequent symptom, reported by 95%. Of these, 81% reported ear pain, 11% pain in the neck or jaw, and 7% facial pain. Tinnitus was reported by 50%, usually accompanied by other symptoms, but in 6% it was the only symptom. Loss of balance was reported by 48%. The most distressing and durable symptom tended to be hyperacusis, reported by 32%.
Consider education and motivation. Set up training sessions for EU Noise Directive and Acoustic Shocks safety needs – something that can be done by bringing the appropriate and independent expertise from the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) or the Acoustic Safety Programme. Remember: educational methods and materials should be tailored to the specific audience. The goal of education and training is not just to inform, but also to motivate. Dynamic, relevant training will imbue workers with a sense of personal control over their hearing health, lead to the development of intrinsic motivation to adopt positive hearing health.
Hello when I stand after sitting and driving I fell like unstedy I can’t hear properly like sounds getting high and low each seconds …after 2 or 3 minutes only I came back normal hearing sounds…I have this problem from last 2 years …on starting stage I got ear infection and undergo nose operation they removed my inside nose tissues still i have this problem what can i do..

A cochlear implant uses a sound processor that you wear behind your ear. A transmitter sends sound signals to a receiver and stimulator implanted under the skin, which stimulate the auditory nerve with electrodes that have been threaded into the cochlea. Some types of cochlear implants have one external unit that has a speech processor, microphone and transmitter combined (lower left), while others have these as separate external parts (upper left and on right).
Deafness is defined as a degree of loss such that a person is unable to understand speech, even in the presence of amplification.[15] In profound deafness, even the highest intensity sounds produced by an audiometer (an instrument used to measure hearing by producing pure tone sounds through a range of frequencies) may not be detected. In total deafness, no sounds at all, regardless of amplification or method of production, can be heard.
While the American College of Physicians indicated that there is not enough evidence to determine the utility of screening in adults over 50 years old who do not have any symptoms,[99] the American Language, Speech Pathology and Hearing Association recommends that adults should be screened at least every decade through age 50 and at 3-year intervals thereafter, to minimize the detrimental effects of the untreated condition on quality of life.[100] For the same reason, the US Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion included as one of Healthy People 2020 objectives: to increase the proportion of persons who have had a hearing examination.[101]

Ginkgo biloba does not appear to be effective.[94][108] The American Academy of Otolaryngology recommends against taking melatonin or zinc supplements to relieve symptoms of tinnitus, and reported that evidence for efficacy of many dietary supplements—lipoflavonoids, garlic, homeopathy, traditional Chinese/Korean herbal medicine, honeybee larvae, other various vitamins and minerals—did not exist.[74] A 2016 Cochrane Review also concluded that evidence was not sufficient to support taking zinc supplements to reduce symptoms associated with tinnitus.[109]


Vertigo is the subjective sensation of the surroundings moving or spinning. It is a symptom of inner ear disease (peripheral) or disorders associated with the brain (central). The cause of many cases of vertigo are unknown (idiopathic) although peripheral vertigo may be related to infection, trauma or chemical irritation of the semicircular canals. Central vertigo may be seen in conditions like multiple sclerosis or strokes.
^ Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 Collaborators (October 2016). "Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 310 diseases and injuries, 1990-2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015". Lancet. 388 (10053): 1545–1602. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(16)31678-6. PMC 5055577. PMID 27733282.
According to Ramirez et al, at a peripheral level TTTS appears to trigger a series of physiological reactions in and around the ear from tympanic membrane tension and alterations in middle ear ventilation. The tensor tympani muscle is innervated by the motor portion of the mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve, and the authors consider that TTTS can lead to, and in an efferent pathway be caused by, an abnormal stimulation of the trigeminal nerve. This can lead to a chronic irritation of the trigeminal nerve, as well as other cranial and cervical sensory nerves of the ear and periauricular region. Central sensitisation can develop from the resultant chronic pain, leading to an expansion of the perceived peripheral pain and resulting in the typical symptoms of severe TMD.
Most people find that their tinnitus does seem to settle down after this initial period, even without doing anything in particular. You might hear this being referred to as habituation. It’s a bit like walking into a room with a noisy fan or air conditioner. Initially, it seems really loud and then after a while, you stop noticing it as much. Tinnitus can often be much the same – initially, it’s more noticeable but you gradually notice it less than you did. The first time you realise it’s in the background is a great moment – it confirms that there are times when it’s less noticeable, which means you should be able to keep doing the things that you enjoy doing.
ASD is beginning to be recognised as a legitimate and discreet disorder, and can be readily misdiagnosed as TMD stemming from TMJ dysfunction. From a differential diagnosis perspective, TMJ dysfunction can lead to TTTS symptoms and escalate to TMD. While central pain sensitisation is common with TMD caused by TMJ dysfunction, the aural symptoms do not tend to escalate and hyperacusis is not usually present.
Assessment of psychological processes related to tinnitus involves measurement of tinnitus severity and distress (i.e., nature and extent of tinnitus-related problems), measured subjectively by validated self-report tinnitus questionnaires.[16] These questionnaires measure the degree of psychological distress and handicap associated with tinnitus, including effects on hearing, lifestyle, health and emotional functioning.[63][64][65] A broader assessment of general functioning, such as levels of anxiety, depression, stress, life stressors and sleep difficulties, is also important in the assessment of tinnitus due to higher risk of negative well-being across these areas, which may be affected by or exacerbate the tinnitus symptoms for the individual.[66] Overall, current assessment measures are aimed to identify individual levels of distress and interference, coping responses and perceptions of tinnitus in order to inform treatment and monitor progress. However, wide variability, inconsistencies and lack of consensus regarding assessment methodology are evidenced in the literature, limiting comparison of treatment effectiveness.[67] Developed to guide diagnosis or classify severity, most tinnitus questionnaires have been shown to be treatment-sensitive outcome measures.[68]
Conductive hearing loss is generally a condition in one ear but can be in both. Depending on the type of conductive loss, treatments may resolve the issue. If the conductive loss is due to earwax, many of our stores can remove this for you. Should the cause be something other than a build-up of earwax, we will refer you to your GP who will assist with a treatment plan.

Conductive hearing loss is sometimes temporary and can be treated with medication or minor surgery, if necessary. However, more major surgery may be required to fix the ear drum or hearing bones. If conventional hearing aids don't work, there are also some implantable devices for this type of hearing loss, such as a Bone Anchored Hearing Aids (BAHAs).

▶ For most inner ear problems, a sodium-restricted, caffeine-free diet is recommended. Caffeine is a central nervous system stimulant and its intake makes the symptoms of inner ear disorder (especially headache and dizziness) appear more pronounced. Hence, it is advisable to reduce the intake of caffeine as much as possible till the condition is completely treated. Excess sugar in the diet also triggers dizziness.
Physical exam: Physical examination will focus on the head and neck, and especially the ears, including the auditory canals and tympanic membranes. Since the sense of hearing is conducted through one of the cranial nerves (the short nerves that lead directly from the brain to the face, head and neck), a careful neurologic exam also may be performed. Weakness or numbness in the face, mouth, and neck may be associated with a tumor or other structural abnormality pressing on a nerve. The healthcare professional may listen to the flow in the carotid arteries in the neck for an abnormal sound (bruit), since carotid artery stenosis (narrowing of the artery) can transmit a sound to the ear that may cause tinnitus.

Often interventions to prevent noise-induced hearing loss have many components. A 2017 Cochrane review found that stricter legislation might reduce noise levels.[97] Providing workers with information on their noise exposure levels was not shown to decrease exposure to noise. Ear protection, if used correctly, can reduce noise to safer levels, but often, providing them is not sufficient to prevent hearing loss. Engineering noise out and other solutions such as proper maintenance of equipment can lead to noise reduction, but further field studies on resulting noise exposures following such interventions are needed. Other possible solutions include improved enforcement of existing legislation and better implementation of well-designed prevention programmes, which have not yet been proven conclusively to be effective. The conclusion of the Cochrane Review was that further research could modify what is now regarding the effectiveness of the evaluated interventions.[97]

^ Flamme GA, Deiters K, Needham T (March 2011). "Distributions of pure-tone hearing threshold levels among adolescents and adults in the United States by gender, ethnicity, and age: Results from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey". International Journal of Audiology. 50 Suppl 1: S11-20. doi:10.3109/14992027.2010.540582. PMID 21288063.
Since 1991, major manufacturers have incorporated an acoustic limiter in the electronics of their headsets to meet the requirements of the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) specification 85/013. In the UK, this limiter ensures that any type of noise (eg conversation, short duration impulses) above 118 dB is not transmitted through the headset.
A cochlear implant uses a sound processor that you wear behind your ear. A transmitter sends sound signals to a receiver and stimulator implanted under the skin, which stimulate the auditory nerve with electrodes that have been threaded into the cochlea. Some types of cochlear implants have one external unit that has a speech processor, microphone and transmitter combined (lower left), while others have these as separate external parts (upper left and on right).
i am currently studying acoustic shock for a course i am taking. i do also work in a headset environment in a large office. I would be interested to hear of anyones experiences of acoustic shock, temporary real or perceived. i myself suffer from the confused hearing loss, unable to clearly know which direction noises are coming from. especially dangerous when you have police, ambulance or fire engine sirens coming close to you. not knowing the direction they are coming from makes it difficult to remove yourself from their way eg at a roundabout… my sleep is also disturbed on occassion, by low drumming noises. this has only happened over the past 5yrs whilst working a lot on the telephone section of my department. a lot of customers answer the phone whilst holding a screaming baby or have a parrot screeching behind them, some shout down the phone suddenly, the noise seems intensified when it is held in a headpiece….
Your ear has three main parts: outer, middle and inner. You use all of them in hearing. Sound waves come in through your outer ear. They reach your middle ear, where they make your eardrum vibrate. The vibrations are transmitted through three tiny bones, called ossicles, in your middle ear. The vibrations travel to your inner ear, a snail-shaped organ. The inner ear makes the nerve impulses that are sent to the brain. Your brain recognizes them as sounds. The inner ear also controls balance.
Tinnitus is sometimes called ‘the sound of silence' because most people, if they are seated in a completely quiet soundproofed room, will hear a type of rushing or hissing sound. Usually this sound is masked by everyday environmental noise. It is when this noise becomes intrusive that it can become irritating and is known as ‘tinnitus'. The more anxious the sufferer gets the worse the tinnitus becomes.
Make appropriate use of personal hearing protection devices. Use equipment that is capable of reducing or eliminating the acoustic shocks. At the very least, have the right equipment in place to offer the minimum protection: that is, ensure that the kit is at least EC Noise Directive compliant. This is not sufficient, but could reduce the effect of acoustic shock.
Hearing loss can also result from taking certain medications. “Ototoxic” medications damage the inner ear, sometimes permanently. Some ototoxic drugs include medicines used to treat serious infections, cancer, and heart disease. Some antibiotics are ototoxic. Even aspirin at some dosages can cause problems. Check with your doctor if you notice a problem while taking a medication.
Barotrauma unequal air pressures in the external and middle ear.[3] This can temporarily occur, for example, by the environmental pressure changes as when shifting altitude, or inside a train going into a tunnel. It is managed by any of various methods of ear clearing manoeuvres to equalize the pressures, like swallowing, yawning, or the Valsalva manoeuvre. More severe barotrauma can lead to middle ear fluid or even permanent sensorineural hearing loss.
Assistive-listening devices, mobile apps, alerting devices, and cochlear implants can help some people with hearing loss. Cochlear implants are electronic devices for people with severe hearing loss. They don’t work for all types of hearing loss. Alert systems can work with doorbells, smoke detectors, and alarm clocks to send you visual signals or vibrations. For example, a flashing light can let you know someone is at the door or the phone is ringing. Some people rely on the vibration setting on their cell phones to alert them to calls.

I wanted to become a surgeon from a very young age and eventually chose ENT surgery for various reasons. Firstly, I had a great mentor when I was a student who was an ENT surgeon. He engaged with me and encouraged me to do research with him which was eventually published. Secondly, ENT surgery is one of only a handful of surgical specialties who see and treat patients of all ages from very small babies to the elderly so the work is very varied.

Fluid accumulation is the most common cause of conductive hearing loss in the middle ear, especially in children.[2] Major causes are ear infections or conditions that block the eustachian tube, such as allergies or tumors.[2] Blocking of the eustachian tube leads to decreased pressure in the middle ear relative to the external ear, and this causes decreased motion of both the ossicles and the tympanic membrane.[3]
Psychological research has focussed on the tinnitus distress reaction (TDR) to account for differences in tinnitus severity.[16][19][20][21] These findings suggest that among those people, conditioning at the initial perception of tinnitus, linked tinnitus with negative emotions, such as fear and anxiety from unpleasant stimuli at the time. This enhances activity in the limbic system and autonomic nervous system, thus increasing tinnitus awareness and annoyance.[22]
Sound waves reach the outer ear and are conducted down the ear canal to the eardrum, causing it to vibrate. The vibrations are transferred by the 3 tiny ear bones of the middle ear to the fluid in the inner ear. The fluid moves hair cells (stereocilia), and their movement generates nerve impulses which are then taken to the brain by the cochlear nerve.[75][76] The auditory nerve takes the impulses to the brainstem, which sends the impulses to the midbrain. Finally, the signal goes to the auditory cortex of the temporal lobe to be interpreted as sound.[77]
Tinnitus is the term for the sensation of hearing a sound in the absence of any external sound. Symptoms of tinnitus are you may hear different types of sound, for example, ringing, whooshing or humming or buzzing in the ear. These can be continuous or they can come and go. The tinnitus might seem like it’s in one ear or both, in the middle of the head or even be difficult to pinpoint. Some people may think the noise is coming from outside and hunt for it until they discover it’s actually inside them!
^ Langguth B, Goodey R, Azevedo A, et al. (2007). "Consensus for tinnitus patient assessment and treatment outcome measurement: Tinnitus Research Initiative meeting, Regensburg, July 2006". Tinnitus: Pathophysiology and Treatment. Progress in Brain Research. 166. pp. 525–36. doi:10.1016/S0079-6123(07)66050-6. ISBN 978-0444531674. PMC 4283806. PMID 17956816.

Assessment of psychological processes related to tinnitus involves measurement of tinnitus severity and distress (i.e., nature and extent of tinnitus-related problems), measured subjectively by validated self-report tinnitus questionnaires.[16] These questionnaires measure the degree of psychological distress and handicap associated with tinnitus, including effects on hearing, lifestyle, health and emotional functioning.[63][64][65] A broader assessment of general functioning, such as levels of anxiety, depression, stress, life stressors and sleep difficulties, is also important in the assessment of tinnitus due to higher risk of negative well-being across these areas, which may be affected by or exacerbate the tinnitus symptoms for the individual.[66] Overall, current assessment measures are aimed to identify individual levels of distress and interference, coping responses and perceptions of tinnitus in order to inform treatment and monitor progress. However, wide variability, inconsistencies and lack of consensus regarding assessment methodology are evidenced in the literature, limiting comparison of treatment effectiveness.[67] Developed to guide diagnosis or classify severity, most tinnitus questionnaires have been shown to be treatment-sensitive outcome measures.[68]


If you think your child has tinnitus, see your child’s GP. They may refer your child to a paediatric ENT specialist for further tests. Therapy and support are available for your child if they are diagnosed with tinnitus and they are bothered or distressed by it. If your child is not bothered by their tinnitus, you may just need reassurance about their condition.
Because call centres often record conversations between their operatives and customers it has been possible to analyse the sounds that give rise to acoustic shock. Sounds have included electrical interference, acoustic feedback, tones from fax machines and noises produced by disgruntled customers. Work in Denmark5 isolated sounds between 100 Hz and 3.8 kHz with intensities varying from 56 to 100 dB. A similar study in Australia1 showed a frequency range of 2.3 to 3.4 kHz with intensities from 82 to 120 dB. The duration of exposure is very difficult to assess because affected call centre operatives remove the handsets or headsets from their ears as quickly as possible after exposure. Certainly the exposure is unlikely to be more than a few seconds. One feature common to acoustic incident sound is that they have a short rise time varying between 0 and 20 ms, reflecting the sudden and unexpected nature of the sound.
Besides being an annoying condition to which most people adapt, persistent tinnitus may cause anxiety and depression in some people.[12][13] Tinnitus annoyance is more strongly associated with the psychological condition of the person than the loudness or frequency range.[14][15] Psychological problems such as depression, anxiety, sleep disturbances, and concentration difficulties are common in those with strongly annoying tinnitus.[16][17] 45% of people with tinnitus have an anxiety disorder at some time in their life.[18]
HSE considers that, in general, call handlers' daily personal noise exposure is unlikely to exceed the 80 dB lower exposure action value defined in the Control of Noise at Work Regulations 2005, provided good practice in the management of noise risks is followed. Call handlers should be encouraged to report to management exposure to acoustic shock incidents and management should keep a record of these reported events.
Tinnitus retraining therapy is a form of treatment that tries to retrain the nerve pathways associated with hearing that may allow the brain to get used to the abnormal sounds. Habituation allows the brain to ignore the tinnitus noise signal, and it allows the person to become unaware that it is present unless they specifically concentrate on the noise. This treatment involves counseling and wearing a sound generator. Audiologists and otolaryngologists often work together in offering this treatment.
Vivien Williams: …become fewer or don't function well. Hearing aids help to increase volume. For people with profound hearing loss, cochlear implants work by bypassing the hair cells and sending signals directly to the hearing nerve and brain. Once health care professionals figure out your type of hearing loss, they can tailor treatment that's best for you. For the Mayo Clinic News Network, I'm Vivien Williams.
Tinnitus (pronounced ti-ni-tis), or ringing in the ears, is the sensation of hearing ringing, buzzing, hissing, chirping, whistling, or other sounds. The noise can be intermittent or continuous, and can vary in loudness. It is often worse when background noise is low, so you may be most aware of it at night when you're trying to fall asleep in a quiet room. In rare cases, the sound beats in sync with your heart (pulsatile tinnitus).
Fluid accumulation is the most common cause of conductive hearing loss in the middle ear, especially in children.[2] Major causes are ear infections or conditions that block the eustachian tube, such as allergies or tumors.[2] Blocking of the eustachian tube leads to decreased pressure in the middle ear relative to the external ear, and this causes decreased motion of both the ossicles and the tympanic membrane.[3]
Noise exposure is the most significant risk factor for noise-induced hearing loss that can be prevented. Different programs exist for specific populations such as school-age children, adolescents and workers.[87] Education regarding noise exposure increases the use of hearing protectors.[88] The use of antioxidants is being studied for the prevention of noise-induced hearing loss, particularly for scenarios in which noise exposure cannot be reduced, such as during military operations.[89]
Tinnitus is usually more noticeable in a quiet environment. It’s a bit like candles on a birthday cake – in the lights, the candles aren’t very bright but if you turn the lights off, the candles seem much brighter. With tinnitus, when there is other sound, it doesn’t seem that loud, but when you turn all the other sound off, the tinnitus seems much more noticeable.

If you are experiencing hearing loss, you should see an ENT (ear, nose, and throat) specialist, or otolaryngologist, who can make a specific diagnosis for you, and talk to you about treatment options, including surgical procedures. A critical part of the evaluation will be a hearing test (audiogram) performed by an audiologist (a professional who tests hearing function) to determine the severity of your loss as well as determine if the hearing loss is conductive, sensorineural, or a mix of both.
Tinnitus is commonly thought of as a symptom of adulthood, and is often overlooked in children. Children with hearing loss have a high incidence of tinnitus, even though they do not express the condition or its effect on their lives.[112][113] Children do not generally report tinnitus spontaneously and their complaints may not be taken seriously.[114] Among those children who do complain of tinnitus, there is an increased likelihood of associated otological or neurological pathology such as migraine, juvenile Meniere's disease or chronic suppurative otitis media.[115] Its reported prevalence varies from 12% to 36% in children with normal hearing thresholds and up to 66% in children with a hearing loss and approximately 3–10% of children have been reported to be troubled by tinnitus.[116]
When TRT was developed in the 1980s by neuroscientist Dr. Pawel Jastreboff, it was designed to be administered according to a strict protocol. Today, the term TRT is being used to describe modified versions of this therapy, and the variations make accurate assessment of its effectiveness difficult. Individual studies have reported improvements in as many as 80% of patients with high-pitched tinnitus.
The use of sound therapy by either hearing aids or tinnitus maskers helps the brain ignore the specific tinnitus frequency. Although these methods are poorly supported by evidence, there are no negative effects.[3][86][87] There are several approaches for tinnitus sound therapy. The first is sound modification to compensate for the individual's hearing loss. The second is a signal spectrum notching to eliminate energy close to the tinnitus frequency.[88][89] There is some tentative evidence supporting tinnitus retraining therapy, which is aimed at reducing tinnitus-related neuronal activity.[3][90][89] There are preliminary data on an alternative tinnitus treatment using mobile applications, including various methods: masking, sound therapy, relaxing exercises and other.[91][92] These applications can work as a separate device or as a hearing aid control system.[93]
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