Rather than a disease, tinnitus is a symptom that may result from various underlying causes.[2] The most common causes are hearing damage, noise-induced hearing loss or age-related hearing loss, known as presbycusis.[2] Other causes include ear infections, disease of the heart or blood vessels, Ménière's disease, brain tumors, exposure to certain medications, a previous head injury, earwax, and sometimes, the tinnitus is suddenly perceived during a period of emotional stress.[2][4] It is more common in those with depression.[3]
A really easy way to relax is to find somewhere peaceful and just slow your breathing down (feel free to have some sound on in the background). You can take a few slow deep breaths and pay full attention to the feeling of the breath entering your body, filling your lungs and leaving your body. When we use deep breathing to relax, we feel calmer and more able to manage the tinnitus, and often don’t notice it as much!
^ McCombe A, Baguley D, Coles R, McKenna L, McKinney C, Windle-Taylor P (2001). "Guidelines for the grading of tinnitus severity: the results of a working group commissioned by the British Association of Otolaryngologists, Head and Neck Surgeons, 1999". Clinical Otolaryngology and Allied Sciences. 26 (5): 388–93. doi:10.1046/j.1365-2273.2001.00490.x. PMID 11678946. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-09-24.

Besides being an annoying condition to which most people adapt, persistent tinnitus may cause anxiety and depression in some people.[12][13] Tinnitus annoyance is more strongly associated with the psychological condition of the person than the loudness or frequency range.[14][15] Psychological problems such as depression, anxiety, sleep disturbances, and concentration difficulties are common in those with strongly annoying tinnitus.[16][17] 45% of people with tinnitus have an anxiety disorder at some time in their life.[18]


There can be damage either to the ear, whether the external or middle ear, to the cochlea, or to the brain centers that process the aural information conveyed by the ears. Damage to the middle ear may include fracture and discontinuity of the ossicular chain. Damage to the inner ear (cochlea) may be caused by temporal bone fracture. People who sustain head injury are especially vulnerable to hearing loss or tinnitus, either temporary or permanent.[73][74]

^ Jump up to: a b c Han BI, Lee HW, Kim TY, Lim JS, Shin KS (March 2009). "Tinnitus: characteristics, causes, mechanisms, and treatments". Journal of Clinical Neurology. 5 (1): 11–19. doi:10.3988/jcn.2009.5.1.11. PMC 2686891. PMID 19513328. About 75% of new cases are related to emotional stress as the trigger factor rather than to precipitants involving cochlear lesions.


For clients with severe ASD, listening to sounds via headphones during a hearing assessment can be highly threatening and often leads to a significant increase in symptoms, which can persist for days. I consider that frequent audiological testing should not be carried out for these clients. Suprathreshold audiological testing should be limited and loudness discomfort testing, in particular acoustic reflex testing due to the volume levels required, is contraindicated. Some ASD clients have unfortunately had their symptoms permanently exacerbated as a result of a traumatic response to acoustic reflex testing.
When asked if the 80-year-old mark for qualification was a bit on the high side, and also about “Mrs. Eighty,” Dr. Ramasamy was quick to respond: “That’s not true; we live in Miami, where sex is of paramount importance to all men regardless of their age. We have had irate patients who are 84 and 85 years of age call us asking why the cutoff is 80, and I feel bad for them, but that’s in our clinical trial criteria. Maybe in the next trial, we could design it to go to 90.”
^ Casale, Manuele; Costantino, Andrea; Rinaldi, Vittorio; Forte, Antonio; Grimaldi, Marta; Sabatino, Lorenzo; Oliveto, Giuseppe; Aloise, Fabio; Pontari, Domenico (2018-11-11). "Mobile applications in otolaryngology for patients: An update". Laryngoscope Investigative Otolaryngology. 3 (6): 434–438. doi:10.1002/lio2.201. ISSN 2378-8038. PMC 6302723. PMID 30599026.
Acoustic shock is an involuntary response to a sound perceived as traumatic (acoustic incident), which causes a specific and consistent pattern of neurophysiological and psychological symptoms (1).  The degree of trauma is influenced by the psychological context of the workplace and/or environment where the acoustic incident exposure occurred. Acoustic shock symptoms are usually temporary, but for some the symptoms can be persistent, escalate and result in a permanent disability. The term acoustic shock disorder (ASD) is used to identify this persistent symptom cluster.

Your symptoms will depend on the cause of your hearing loss and your age. For adults, symptoms may include having trouble hearing. A common first sign is difficulty in understanding people, particularly in noisy places. You may complain that others are mumbling. Your ear may feel muffled, blocked or plugged. You may also feel as though there is water or pressure in your ear.


Depression is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In older adults, the suicide rate is higher than it is for younger adults, and more suicide cases are attributable to depression.[38] Different studies have been done to investigate potential risk factors that can give rise to depression in later life. Some chronic diseases are found to be significantly associated with risk of developing depression, such as coronary heart disease, pulmonary disease, vision loss and hearing loss.[39] Hearing loss can attribute to decrease in health-related quality of life, increase in social isolation and decline in social engagement, which are all risk factors for increased risk of developing depression symptoms.[40]
To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure [email protected] is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.
The middle ear is connected to the back of your nose and upper part of your throat by a narrow channel called the auditory tube (eustachian tube). The tube opens and closes at the throat end to equalize the pressure in the middle ear with that of the environment and drain fluids. Equal pressure on both sides of the eardrum is important for normal vibration of the eardrum.
Hearing loss is associated with Alzheimer's disease and dementia. The risk increases with the hearing loss degree. There are several hypotheses including cognitive resources being redistributed to hearing and social isolation from hearing loss having a negative effect.[27] According to preliminary data, hearing aid usage can slow down the decline in cognitive functions.[28]
Tinnitus may be perceived in one or both ears. The noise can be described in many different ways but is reported as a noise inside a person's head in the absence of auditory stimulation. It often is described as a ringing noise, but in some people, it takes the form of a high-pitched whining, electric buzzing, hissing, humming, tinging, whistling, ticking, clicking, roaring, beeping, sizzling, a pure steady tone such as that heard during a hearing test, or sounds that slightly resemble human voices, tunes, songs, or animal sounds such as "crickets", "tree frogs", or "locusts (cicadas)".[4] Tinnitus may be intermittent or continuous: in the latter case, it may be the cause of great distress. In some individuals, the intensity may be changed by shoulder, head, tongue, jaw, or eye movements.[7]
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