Conductive hearing loss is generally a condition in one ear but can be in both. Depending on the type of conductive loss, treatments may resolve the issue. If the conductive loss is due to earwax, many of our stores can remove this for you. Should the cause be something other than a build-up of earwax, we will refer you to your GP who will assist with a treatment plan.
HSE considers that, in general, call handlers' daily personal noise exposure is unlikely to exceed the 80 dB lower exposure action value defined in the Control of Noise at Work Regulations 2005, provided good practice in the management of noise risks is followed. Call handlers should be encouraged to report to management exposure to acoustic shock incidents and management should keep a record of these reported events.
Some medications may reversibly affect hearing. These medications are considered ototoxic. This includes loop diuretics such as furosemide and bumetanide, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) both over-the-counter (aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen) as well as prescription (celecoxib, diclofenac, etc.), paracetamol, quinine, and macrolide antibiotics.[63] Others may cause permanent hearing loss.[64] The most important group is the aminoglycosides (main member gentamicin) and platinum based chemotherapeutics such as cisplatin and carboplatin.[65][66]
As of 2018 there were no medications effective for idiopathic tinnitus.[3][74][94] There is not enough evidence to determine if antidepressants[95] or acamprosate are useful.[96] There is no high-quality evidence to support the use of benzodiazepines for tinnitus.[3][94][97] Usefulness of melatonin, as of 2015, is unclear.[98] It is unclear if anticonvulsants are useful for treating tinnitus.[3][99] Steroid injections into the middle ear also do not seem to be effective.[100][101] There is no evidence to suggest that the use of betahistine to treat tinnitius is effective.[102]
Sound waves travel through the ear canal to the middle and inner ear, where hair cells in part of the cochlea help transform sound waves into electrical signals that then travel to the brain's auditory cortex via the auditory nerve. When hair cells are damaged — by loud noise or ototoxic drugs, for example — the circuits in the brain don't receive the signals they're expecting. This stimulates abnormal activity in the neurons, which results in the illusion of sound, or tinnitus.
Falls have important health implications, especially for an aging population where they can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Elderly people are particularly vulnerable to the consequences of injuries caused by falls, since older individuals typically have greater bone fragility and poorer protective reflexes.[35] Fall-related injury can also lead to burdens on the financial and health care systems.[35] In literature, age-related hearing loss is found to be significantly associated with incident falls.[36] There is also a potential dose-response relationship between hearing loss and falls---greater severity of hearing loss is associated with increased difficulties in postural control and increased prevalence of falls.[37] The underlying causal link between the association of hearing loss and falls is yet to be elucidated. There are several hypotheses that indicate that there may be a common process between decline in auditory system and increase in incident falls, driven by physiological, cognitive, and behavioral factors.[37] This evidence suggests that treating hearing loss has potential to increase health-related quality of life in older adults.[37]
Call centre staff are therefore particularly vulnerable: the workplaces are often large, open plan environments with high levels of ambient noise, requiring the operator to turn up the volume of their headset, increasing vulnerability to acoustic incident exposure. Additionally, the workplace environment is potentially stressful: the job requirements are often competitive, monitored and repetitive, with the calls made frequently unwelcome
Acoustic shock disorder (ASD) is an involuntary response to a sound perceived as traumatic (usually a sudden, unexpected loud sound heard near the ear), which causes a specific and consistent pattern of neurophysiological and psychological symptoms. These include aural pain/fullness, tinnitus, hyperacusis, muffled hearing, vertigo and other unusual symptoms such as numbness or burning sensations around the ear. Typically, people describe acoustic shock as feeling like they have been stabbed or electrocuted in the ear. If symptoms persist, a range of emotional reactions including post traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression can develop.
The ear is one of the most vital sensory organs of the human body. It comprises three major parts: the outer ear, middle ear and inner ear. The outer ear includes the pinna and ear canal. It is separated from the middle ear by an eardrum. The middle ear is an air-filled space present behind the eardrum. The inner ear consists of a system of canals and fluid-filled tube-like structures called labyrinth. There may be various problems associated with the inner ear, which can lead to problems in hearing and balance.
A brain tumor can be either non-cancerous (benign) or cancerous (malignant), primary, or secondary. Common symptoms of a primary brain tumor are headaches, seizures, memory problems, personality changes, and nausea and vomiting. Causes and risk factors include age, gender, family history, and exposure to chemicals. Treatment is depends upon the tumor type, grade, and location.
Outer ear infection: otitis externa – usually affects adults aged 45 to 75. It affects the ear canal and is often caused by bacterial infection of the skin of the canal, or a fungus or a yeast. It can also be caused by an irritation such as wearing earplugs or a hearing aid. It is common in people who suffer from skin problems such as eczema, psoriasis or dermatitis but also in people who are keen swimmers.
According to Ramirez et al, at a peripheral level TTTS appears to trigger a series of physiological reactions in and around the ear from tympanic membrane tension and alterations in middle ear ventilation. The tensor tympani muscle is innervated by the motor portion of the mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve, and the authors consider that TTTS can lead to, and in an efferent pathway be caused by, an abnormal stimulation of the trigeminal nerve. This can lead to a chronic irritation of the trigeminal nerve, as well as other cranial and cervical sensory nerves of the ear and periauricular region. Central sensitisation can develop from the resultant chronic pain, leading to an expansion of the perceived peripheral pain and resulting in the typical symptoms of severe TMD.

Having information about tinnitus can be very helpful. A lot of people start off looking online and while there is some fantastic information available on the internet, there is also a lot of very unhelpful information. An easy way to ensure what you are reading is appropriately written and produced is to check that the Information Standard has been adhered to - all our information complies with the Information Standard.
^ Jump up to: a b Schecklmann, Martin; Vielsmeier, Veronika; Steffens, Thomas; Landgrebe, Michael; Langguth, Berthold; Kleinjung, Tobias; Andersson, Gerhard (18 April 2012). "Relationship between Audiometric Slope and Tinnitus Pitch in Tinnitus Patients: Insights into the Mechanisms of Tinnitus Generation". PLOS ONE. 7 (4): e34878. Bibcode:2012PLoSO...734878S. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0034878. PMC 3329543. PMID 22529949.

The use of sound therapy by either hearing aids or tinnitus maskers helps the brain ignore the specific tinnitus frequency. Although these methods are poorly supported by evidence, there are no negative effects.[3][86][87] There are several approaches for tinnitus sound therapy. The first is sound modification to compensate for the individual's hearing loss. The second is a signal spectrum notching to eliminate energy close to the tinnitus frequency.[88][89] There is some tentative evidence supporting tinnitus retraining therapy, which is aimed at reducing tinnitus-related neuronal activity.[3][90][89] There are preliminary data on an alternative tinnitus treatment using mobile applications, including various methods: masking, sound therapy, relaxing exercises and other.[91][92] These applications can work as a separate device or as a hearing aid control system.[93]
If your tinnitus is causing anxiety, disrupting your life or stopping you doing the things you enjoy, your doctor may refer you for cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). The aim of CBT is to help you think differently about the condition and achieve a more positive attitude. It also helps you identify anything you might be doing that is making the condition worse. CBT doesn’t help reduce the loudness of the sounds you hear. But it can help you to cope with it, deal with any negative feelings and change how you think about tinnitus. So it may help to improve your quality of life.

Sound waves reach the outer ear and are conducted down the ear canal to the eardrum, causing it to vibrate. The vibrations are transferred by the 3 tiny ear bones of the middle ear to the fluid in the inner ear. The fluid moves hair cells (stereocilia), and their movement generates nerve impulses which are then taken to the brain by the cochlear nerve.[75][76] The auditory nerve takes the impulses to the brainstem, which sends the impulses to the midbrain. Finally, the signal goes to the auditory cortex of the temporal lobe to be interpreted as sound.[77]

Tinnitus is sometimes called ‘the sound of silence' because most people, if they are seated in a completely quiet soundproofed room, will hear a type of rushing or hissing sound. Usually this sound is masked by everyday environmental noise. It is when this noise becomes intrusive that it can become irritating and is known as ‘tinnitus'. The more anxious the sufferer gets the worse the tinnitus becomes.
If there is a change in the system, for example, a hearing loss or ear infection, the amount of information being sent to the brain changes. The brain then responds to this change in levels by trying to get more information from the ear, and the extra information you may get is the sound we call tinnitus. The tinnitus is therefore actually brain activity and not the ear itself! It is generally accepted that it isn’t only a change in the ear that can result in tinnitus, but it could be due to a change in our stress levels, for example, with tinnitus being noticed after periods of significant stress, a change in life circumstances or general wellbeing.
^ Tyler RS, Pienkowski M, Roncancio ER, Jun HJ, Brozoski T, Dauman N, Dauman N, Andersson G, Keiner AJ, Cacace AT, Martin N, Moore BC (2014). "A review of hyperacusis and future directions: part I. Definitions and manifestations" (PDF). American Journal of Audiology. 23 (4): 402–19. doi:10.1044/2014_AJA-14-0010. PMID 25104073. Archived (PDF) from the original on May 9, 2018. Retrieved September 23, 2017.
Assistive-listening devices, mobile apps, alerting devices, and cochlear implants can help some people with hearing loss. Cochlear implants are electronic devices for people with severe hearing loss. They don’t work for all types of hearing loss. Alert systems can work with doorbells, smoke detectors, and alarm clocks to send you visual signals or vibrations. For example, a flashing light can let you know someone is at the door or the phone is ringing. Some people rely on the vibration setting on their cell phones to alert them to calls.
It is not a disease or illness; it is a symptom generated within the auditory system and usually caused by an underlying condition. The noise may be in one or both ears, or it may feel like it is in the head. It is difficult to pinpoint its exact location. It may be low, medium or high pitched and can be heard as a single noise or as multiple components.
Tinnitus (pronounced ti-ni-tis), or ringing in the ears, is the sensation of hearing ringing, buzzing, hissing, chirping, whistling, or other sounds. The noise can be intermittent or continuous, and can vary in loudness. It is often worse when background noise is low, so you may be most aware of it at night when you're trying to fall asleep in a quiet room. In rare cases, the sound beats in sync with your heart (pulsatile tinnitus).
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