Acoustic shock disorder (ASD) is an involuntary response to a sound perceived as traumatic (usually a sudden, unexpected loud sound heard near the ear), which causes a specific and consistent pattern of neurophysiological and psychological symptoms. These include aural pain/fullness, tinnitus, hyperacusis, muffled hearing, vertigo and other unusual symptoms such as numbness or burning sensations around the ear. Typically, people describe acoustic shock as feeling like they have been stabbed or electrocuted in the ear. If symptoms persist, a range of emotional reactions including post traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression can develop.

Psychological research has focussed on the tinnitus distress reaction (TDR) to account for differences in tinnitus severity.[16][19][20][21] These findings suggest that among those people, conditioning at the initial perception of tinnitus, linked tinnitus with negative emotions, such as fear and anxiety from unpleasant stimuli at the time. This enhances activity in the limbic system and autonomic nervous system, thus increasing tinnitus awareness and annoyance.[22]

Is conductive hearing loss curable? Yes, often. Most cases of conductive hearing loss are temporary and are cured by means of appropriate medical treatment, so it is important to seek immediate medical assistance. Other types of conductive hearing losses can be treated with hearing aids or types of hearing implants. Finally, some types of conductive hearing loss can be treated through surgery.

The most important thing you can do if you think you have a hearing problem is to seek professional advice. Your family doctor may be able to diagnose and treat your hearing problem. Or, your doctor may refer you to other experts, like an otolaryngologist (ear, nose, and throat doctor) or an audiologist (health professional who can identify and measure hearing loss).
Prevention involves avoiding exposure to loud noise for longer periods or chronically.[2] If there is an underlying cause, treating it may lead to improvements.[3] Otherwise, typically, management involves psychoeducation or counseling as talk therapy.[5] Sound generators or hearing aids may help some.[2] As of 2013, there were no effective medications.[3] It is common, affecting about 10–15% of people.[5] Most, however, tolerate it well, and it is a significant problem in only 1–2% of people.[5] The word tinnitus comes from the Latin tinnire which means "to ring".[3]

Dizziness usually refers to feeling lightheaded where the patient feels unsteady similar to the sensation felt before fainting. The causes of dizziness may be due to a wide range of conditions, many of which do not involve the ear, example : low blood sugar, sudden drop in blood pressure, alcohol and certain drugs. However, many of the causes of peripheral vertigo may result in a lightheaded feeling without the typical vertigo sensation, especially in milder cases.

The accepted definition of chronic tinnitus, as compared to normal ear noise experience, is five minutes of ear noise occurring at least twice a week.[51] However, people with chronic tinnitus often experience the noise more frequently than this and can experience it continuously or regularly, such as during the night when there is less environmental noise to mask the sound.


Typically, people describe acoustic shock as feeling like they have been stabbed or electrocuted in the ear. The symptoms are involuntary, unpleasant and frightening; they can range from mild to severe; and be of short, temporary duration or persistent. If symptoms persist, a range of emotional reactions including trauma, anxiety and depression can develop.
Outer ear infection: otitis externa – usually affects adults aged 45 to 75. It affects the ear canal and is often caused by bacterial infection of the skin of the canal, or a fungus or a yeast. It can also be caused by an irritation such as wearing earplugs or a hearing aid. It is common in people who suffer from skin problems such as eczema, psoriasis or dermatitis but also in people who are keen swimmers.
Itching (pruritis) of the ear due to otitis externa is caused primarily by irritation with foreign objects like a cotton ear swabs, hair pins, pens/pencils and matchsticks. The accumulation of water, dust or dirt, sand and other foreign particles that can enter the ear may also be responsible. An allergic reaction may occur or an infection may arise. Certain itchy skin conditions like psoriasis and eczema may also be responsible for itching of the ear canal.
Atherosclerosis. With age and buildup of cholesterol and other deposits, major blood vessels close to your middle and inner ear lose some of their elasticity — the ability to flex or expand slightly with each heartbeat. That causes blood flow to become more forceful, making it easier for your ear to detect the beats. You can generally hear this type of tinnitus in both ears.
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