TTTS was originally described by Dr I. Klockhoff (9-12), and has been proposed by Patuzzi, Milhinch and Doyle (13) and Patuzzi (7) as the neurophysiological mechanism causing most of the persistent ASD symptoms. TTTS is an involuntary condition where the centrally mediated reflex threshold for tensor tympani muscle activity becomes reduced as a result of anxiety and trauma, so it is continually and rhythmically contracting and relaxing, aggravated by intolerable sound exposure1. This appears to initiate a cascade of physiological reactions in and around the ear, which can include: tympanic membrane flutter; alterations in ventilation of the middle ear cavity leading to a sense of blockage or fullness, as well as muffled/echoey/distorted hearing; irritation of the trigeminal nerve innervating the tensor tympani muscle, leading to frequent neuralgic pain; and symptoms consistent with temporomandibular disorder (TMD).

Hearing loss is common with approximately 16% of adults having a hearing loss. There are different types of deafness. Some are caused by problems with the cochlear or the nerve of hearing, others are caused by middle ear fluid (glue ear), problems with the eardrum or the tiny hearing bones in the middle ear. Treatment depends on the underlying cause and can include surgery or a hearing aid. 
^ "Childhood hearing loss: act now, here's how!" (PDF). WHO. 2016. p. 6. Archived (PDF) from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 2 March 2016. Over 30% of childhood hearing loss is caused by diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, meningitis and ear infections. These can be prevented through immunization and good hygiene practices. Another 17% of childhood hearing loss results from complications at birth, including prematurity, low birth weight, birth asphyxia and neonatal jaundice. Improved maternal and child health practices would help to prevent these complications. The use of ototoxic medicines in expectant mothers and newborns, which is responsible for 4% of childhood hearing loss, could potentially be avoided.
Prevention involves avoiding exposure to loud noise for longer periods or chronically.[2] If there is an underlying cause, treating it may lead to improvements.[3] Otherwise, typically, management involves psychoeducation or counseling as talk therapy.[5] Sound generators or hearing aids may help some.[2] As of 2013, there were no effective medications.[3] It is common, affecting about 10–15% of people.[5] Most, however, tolerate it well, and it is a significant problem in only 1–2% of people.[5] The word tinnitus comes from the Latin tinnire which means "to ring".[3]
Inside your inner ear is the cochlea. This is a coiled tube that is full of fluid and contains tiny hair cells. The vibrations from the middle ear cause the fluid in your cochlea to move the hair cells. When this happens, the hair cells produce electrical signals that pass to the auditory nerve. The auditory nerves transmits these signals to your brain, which converts them into meaningful information such as language or music.
Ginkgo biloba does not appear to be effective.[94][108] The American Academy of Otolaryngology recommends against taking melatonin or zinc supplements to relieve symptoms of tinnitus, and reported that evidence for efficacy of many dietary supplements—lipoflavonoids, garlic, homeopathy, traditional Chinese/Korean herbal medicine, honeybee larvae, other various vitamins and minerals—did not exist.[74] A 2016 Cochrane Review also concluded that evidence was not sufficient to support taking zinc supplements to reduce symptoms associated with tinnitus.[109]
Tinnitus is very common and is reported in all age groups, even young children. About 30% of people will experience tinnitus at some point in their lives but the number of people who live with persistent tinnitus is approximately 13% (over 1 in 8). Tinnitus is more common in people who have hearing loss or other ear problems, but it can also be found in people with normal hearing.
Repeated loud noise exposure can be a cause of tinnitus as well as hearing loss. Loud music may cause short term symptoms, but repeated occupational exposure (for example, musicians, factory and construction workers) requires less intense sound levels to cause potential hearing damage leading to tinnitus. Minimizing sound exposure, therefore, decreases the risk of developing tinnitus. Sound protection equipment, like acoustic ear-muffs, may be appropriate at work and at home when exposed to loud noises.
Tinnitus also could be the result of neural circuits thrown out of balance when damage in the inner ear changes signaling activity in the auditory cortex, the part of the brain that processes sound. Or it could be the result of abnormal interactions between neural circuits. The neural circuits involved in hearing aren’t solely dedicated to processing sound. They also communicate with other parts of the brain, such as the limbic region, which regulates mood and emotion.
Various theories about the pathophysiology of acoustic shock have been proposed.2–4,6,7 One popular theory is that the symptoms are caused by tonic tensor tympani syndrome2,3: the initial response after an acoustic incident is thought to be an exaggerated startle response with contraction of the tensor tympani muscle in addition to the normal acoustic protection provided by the stapedial reflex. Continued contraction of the tensor tympani muscle then generates many of the symptoms of acoustic shock including aural pain and fullness, tinnitus, vertigo and distortion of hearing. Although this model has many proponents there is as yet no robust scientific support. Cochlear damage has been suggested as a mechanism but the absence of sensorineural hearing loss in many cases militates against this theory.
▶ If inner ear disorders is due to an infection, then medications are prescribed to control or manage the symptoms of the infection. In case the infection is due to a bacterial infection, antibiotics are prescribed to clear it up. For people who are suffering from vertigo due to inner ear disorders, vestibular therapy is often recommended, and is highly effective.
Acoustic shock is an involuntary response to a sound perceived as traumatic (acoustic incident), which causes a specific and consistent pattern of neurophysiological and psychological symptoms (1).  The degree of trauma is influenced by the psychological context of the workplace and/or environment where the acoustic incident exposure occurred. Acoustic shock symptoms are usually temporary, but for some the symptoms can be persistent, escalate and result in a permanent disability. The term acoustic shock disorder (ASD) is used to identify this persistent symptom cluster.
Tinnitus is very common and is reported in all age groups, even young children. About 30% of people will experience tinnitus at some point in their lives but the number of people who live with persistent tinnitus is approximately 13% (over 1 in 8). Tinnitus is more common in people who have hearing loss or other ear problems, but it can also be found in people with normal hearing.
Conductive hearing loss (CHL) occurs when there is a problem transferring sound waves anywhere along the pathway through the outer ear, tympanic membrane (eardrum), or middle ear (ossicles). If a conductive hearing loss occurs in conjunction with a sensorineural hearing loss, it is referred to as a mixed hearing loss. Depending upon the severity and nature of the conductive loss, this type of hearing impairment can often be treated with surgical intervention or pharmaceuticals to partially or, in some cases, fully restore hearing acuity to within normal range. However, cases of permanent or chronic conductive hearing loss may require other treatment modalities such as hearing aid devices to improve detection of sound and speech perception.
If you are experiencing hearing loss, you should see an ENT (ear, nose, and throat) specialist, or otolaryngologist, who can make a specific diagnosis for you, and talk to you about treatment options, including surgical procedures. A critical part of the evaluation will be a hearing test (audiogram) performed by an audiologist (a professional who tests hearing function) to determine the severity of your loss as well as determine if the hearing loss is conductive, sensorineural, or a mix of both.
Most hearing loss, that resulting from age and noise, is progressive and irreversible, and there are currently no approved or recommended treatments. A few specific kinds of hearing loss are amenable to surgical treatment. In other cases, treatment is addressed to underlying pathologies, but any hearing loss incurred may be permanent. Some management options include hearing aids, cochlear implants, assistive technology, and closed captioning.[9] This choice depends on the level of hearing loss, type of hearing loss, and personal preference. Hearing aid applications are one of the options for hearing loss management.[82] For people with bilateral hearing loss, it is not clear if bilateral hearing aids (hearing aids in both ears) are better than a unilateral hearing aid (hearing aid in one ear).[9]
The Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the German Social Accident Insurance has created a hearing impairment calculator based on the ISO 1999 model for studying threshold shift in relatively homogeneous groups of people, such as workers with the same type of job. The ISO 1999 model estimates how much hearing impairment in a group can be ascribed to age and noise exposure. The result is calculated via an algebraic equation that uses the A-weighted noise exposure level, how many years the people were exposed to this noise, how old the people are, and their sex. The model’s estimations are only useful for people without hearing loss due to non-job related exposure and can be used for prevention activities.[98]
Prolonged exposure to loud sound or noise levels can lead to tinnitus.[74] Ear plugs or other measures can help with prevention. Employers may use hearing loss prevention programs to help educate and prevent dangerous levels of exposure to noise. Groups like NIOSH and OSHA help set regulations to ensure employees, if following the protocol, should have minimal risk to permanent damage to their hearing.[75]

In a cultural context, Deaf culture refers to a tight-knit cultural group of people whose primary language is signed, and who practice social and cultural norms which are distinct from those of the surrounding hearing community. This community does not automatically include all those who are clinically or legally deaf, nor does it exclude every hearing person. According to Baker and Padden, it includes any person or persons who "identifies him/herself as a member of the Deaf community, and other members accept that person as a part of the community",[4] an example being children of deaf adults with normal hearing ability. It includes the set of social beliefs, behaviors, art, literary traditions, history, values, and shared institutions of communities that are influenced by deafness and which use sign languages as the main means of communication.[2][3] Members of the Deaf community tend to view deafness as a difference in human experience rather than a disability or disease.[5][6]
Your ear has three main parts: outer, middle and inner. You use all of them in hearing. Sound waves come in through your outer ear. They reach your middle ear, where they make your eardrum vibrate. The vibrations are transmitted through three tiny bones, called ossicles, in your middle ear. The vibrations travel to your inner ear, a snail-shaped organ. The inner ear makes the nerve impulses that are sent to the brain. Your brain recognizes them as sounds. The inner ear also controls balance.
This article was medically reviewed by Luba Lee, FNP-BC, MS. Luba Lee, FNP-BC is a board certified Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) and educator in Tennessee with over a decade of clinical experience. Luba has certifications in Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS), Emergency Medicine, Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), Team Building, and Critical Care Nursing. She received her Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) from the University of Tennessee in 2006. This article has been viewed 3,276,631 times.

People who live with tinnitus might have difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep. In order to sleep well, our bodies and our minds need to be relaxed. Worrying about the tinnitus, or worrying about how much sleep you’re getting (or missing out on), is unhelpful and will only make it more difficult to sleep. Most people with tinnitus sleep well and their tinnitus is no different from those who do not sleep well. People who have tinnitus and sleep poorly tend to worry more at night than people with tinnitus who sleep well. Working through problems during waking hours is better than in the middle of the night when you have nothing else to occupy you.
Because call centres often record conversations between their operatives and customers it has been possible to analyse the sounds that give rise to acoustic shock. Sounds have included electrical interference, acoustic feedback, tones from fax machines and noises produced by disgruntled customers. Work in Denmark5 isolated sounds between 100 Hz and 3.8 kHz with intensities varying from 56 to 100 dB. A similar study in Australia1 showed a frequency range of 2.3 to 3.4 kHz with intensities from 82 to 120 dB. The duration of exposure is very difficult to assess because affected call centre operatives remove the handsets or headsets from their ears as quickly as possible after exposure. Certainly the exposure is unlikely to be more than a few seconds. One feature common to acoustic incident sound is that they have a short rise time varying between 0 and 20 ms, reflecting the sudden and unexpected nature of the sound.

This is a very structured approach to managing tinnitus. Basically, TRT assumes that the tinnitus has been prioritised as an important signal. TRT uses sounds at a particular level to try to reduce the priority of the tinnitus so that you no longer hear it. It is based on the idea that we can get used to sounds, e.g. the sound of the fridge or air conditioner, so we can also get used to this sound of tinnitus. The process of getting used to the tinnitus sound is called habituation. TRT uses sound generators and counselling to attempt to retrain how the brain processes sound so that you habituate to the tinnitus. Most people working in the tinnitus field will use elements of TRT but the strict method is not frequently used because there is limited evidence for its effectiveness.
Tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, is the perception of sound when there is no external sound present. It is not a condition by itself but instead a symptom of an underlying cause. Many patients describe the sound as a high-pitched ringing, but it may also be a clicking, buzzing, whooshing, roaring, or hissing. The sound can vary in volume and can be either unilateral or bilateral. In most patients, tinnitus occurs gradually. It can significantly impact the quality of life, causing depression, anxiety, and loss of concentration.

▶ If inner ear disorders is due to an infection, then medications are prescribed to control or manage the symptoms of the infection. In case the infection is due to a bacterial infection, antibiotics are prescribed to clear it up. For people who are suffering from vertigo due to inner ear disorders, vestibular therapy is often recommended, and is highly effective.


^ Fuente A, Qiu W, Zhang M, Xie H, Kardous CA, Campo P, Morata TC (March 2018). "Use of the kurtosis statistic in an evaluation of the effects of noise and solvent exposures on the hearing thresholds of workers: An exploratory study" (PDF). The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 143 (3): 1704–1710. Bibcode:2018ASAJ..143.1704F. doi:10.1121/1.5028368. PMID 29604694.
The first major report regarding acoustic shock was published in Denmark5 but this was part of an internal company report and the text not easily accessible. The first widely available publication was from Australia1 and described the clinical features of 103 call centre workers who had been exposed to acoustic incidents. There have been further publications describing acoustic shock from Australia,6 the United Kingdom7,8 and India.9 Although there has been some interest generated regarding this geographical distribution there are unofficial reports of acoustic shock occurring in many other countries. There are also anecdotal reports of acoustic shock symptomatology occurring in people exposed to sudden unexpected sound but not wearing headsets or handsets. In these cases the causative sound is usually generated close to the person and this proximity of the sound source to the ear does seem to be a common feature of the syndrome. There have been reports of acoustic shock occurring in clusters. There is a slight female preponderance of cases of acoustic shock though further work is needed to ascertain whether this gender imbalance is genuine or simply reflects the gender distribution of call centre work.
With the identification of ASD, output limiters in headset equipment have been developed to restrict maximum volume levels transmitted down a telephone line. However, ASD continues to occur despite their use. In my opinion, they are of benefit primarily to help reduce the probability of an initial acoustic incident exposure. The dominant factors of an acoustic incident leading to ASD appear related to the sudden onset, unexpectedness and impact quality of loudish sounds outside the person's control near to the ear(s), rather than to high volume levels alone. If TTTS develops, because of the vulnerability of further escalation to acoustic incidents at lower volume levels, it is impossible to give a 100% guarantee of protection.
For clients with severe ASD, listening to sounds via headphones during a hearing assessment can be highly threatening and often leads to a significant increase in symptoms, which can persist for days. I consider that frequent audiological testing should not be carried out for these clients. Suprathreshold audiological testing should be limited and loudness discomfort testing, in particular acoustic reflex testing due to the volume levels required, is contraindicated. Some ASD clients have unfortunately had their symptoms permanently exacerbated as a result of a traumatic response to acoustic reflex testing.
Hearing loss has been shown to negatively impact people’s quality of life and their mental state. If you develop hearing loss, you may have difficulty understanding others. This can increase your anxiety level or cause depression. Treatment for hearing loss may improve your life significantly. It may restore self-confidence while also improving your ability to communicate with other people.
People often say that they are aware of noises in the ears when they have a cold, an ear infection or wax blocking the ear. Sometimes people become aware of tinnitus following a really stressful event and once they’re aware of it, seem to notice it more and more, but this usually fades once these things have passed. However, some people continue to notice the tinnitus, for example after an infection has cleared up.
When the sound waves reach the inner ear, they travel through the fluids of the cochlea. The cochlea is a snail-shaped structure in the inner ear. In the cochlea, there are nerve cells with thousands of miniature hairs attached to them. These hairs help convert the sound wave vibrations into electrical signals that then travel to your brain. Your brain interprets these electrical signals as sound. Different sound vibrations create different reactions in these tiny hairs, signaling different sounds to your brain.
There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that some tinnitus is a consequence of neuroplastic alterations in the central auditory pathway. These alterations are assumed to result from a disturbed sensory input, caused by hearing loss.[26] Hearing loss could indeed cause a homeostatic response of neurons in the central auditory system, and therefore cause tinnitus.[27]
Deaf culture refers to a tight-knit cultural group of people whose primary language is signed, and who practice social and cultural norms which are distinct from those of the surrounding hearing community. This community does not automatically include all those who are clinically or legally deaf, nor does it exclude every hearing person. According to Baker and Padden, it includes any person or persons who "identifies him/herself as a member of the Deaf community, and other members accept that person as a part of the community,"[114] an example being children of deaf adults with normal hearing ability. It includes the set of social beliefs, behaviors, art, literary traditions, history, values, and shared institutions of communities that are influenced by deafness and which use sign languages as the main means of communication.[115][116] Members of the Deaf community tend to view deafness as a difference in human experience rather than a disability or disease.[117][118] When used as a cultural label especially within the culture, the word deaf is often written with a capital D and referred to as "big D Deaf" in speech and sign. When used as a label for the audiological condition, it is written with a lower case d.[115][116]
Hello when I stand after sitting and driving I fell like unstedy I can’t hear properly like sounds getting high and low each seconds …after 2 or 3 minutes only I came back normal hearing sounds…I have this problem from last 2 years …on starting stage I got ear infection and undergo nose operation they removed my inside nose tissues still i have this problem what can i do..
Ringing/buzzing/humming/ringing are all called tinnitus. The best things you can do are A) avoid loud noise exposure, as noise exposure can make it worse, B) limit your salt and caffeine intake, as both of these have been linked with tinnitus, C) avoid silent environments (i.e. sleep with a fan/radio/podcast on, do homework while listening to music, etc). While there is no cure for tinnitus and no way to make it vanish completely, avoiding loud noise exposure and using gentle background noise are the recommended "treatments."
Rapid referral for a comprehensive audiological assessment provides reassurance, and can help control an escalation of symptoms and limit the development of hyperacusis. History taking should document immediate and persistent symptoms since the acoustic incident exposure; prior acoustic incident exposures; and prior otological and psychological history. Significant malingering is rare in ASD clients, in my experience. Most clients are bewildered, frightened or angered by their symptoms and desperate to recover.

Human hearing extends in frequency from 20 to 20,000 Hz, and in intensity from 0 dB to 120 dB HL or more. 0 dB does not represent absence of sound, but rather the softest sound an average unimpaired human ear can hear; some people can hear down to −5 or even −10 dB. Sound is generally uncomfortably loud above 90 dB and 115 dB represents the threshold of pain. The ear does not hear all frequencies equally well: hearing sensitivity peaks around 3000 Hz. There are many qualities of human hearing besides frequency range and intensity that cannot easily be measured quantitatively. However, for many practical purposes, normal hearing is defined by a frequency versus intensity graph, or audiogram, charting sensitivity thresholds of hearing at defined frequencies. Because of the cumulative impact of age and exposure to noise and other acoustic insults, 'typical' hearing may not be normal.[25][26]

An assessment of hyperacusis, a frequent accompaniment of tinnitus,[57] may also be made.[58] The measured parameter is Loudness Discomfort Level (LDL) in dB, the subjective level of acute discomfort at specified frequencies over the frequency range of hearing. This defines a dynamic range between the hearing threshold at that frequency and the loudnes discomfort level. A compressed dynamic range over a particular frequency range is associated with subjectve hyperacusis. Normal hearing threshold is generally defined as 0–20 decibels (dB). Normal loudness discomfort levels are 85–90+ dB, with some authorities citing 100 dB. A dynamic range of 55 dB or less is indicative of hyperacusis.[59][60]

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